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Another economic miracle? The German labor market and the Great Recession

  • Ulf Rinne

    ()

  • Klaus Zimmermann

    ()

Germany’s labor market responded only mildly to the Great Recession. Important factors for this development include the strong economic position due to recent labor market reforms, the crisis affecting mainly export-oriented companies, the extension of short-time work, time buffers due to working time accounts, the behavior of social partners, and automatic stabilizers. We emphasize the important interaction between short-time work and long-term shortages of skilled workers in sectors particularly affected by the crisis. Although Germany’s experience is in stark contrast to the United States, we identify and discuss common challenges at the center of the future jobs debate. Copyright Rinne and Zimmermann; licensee Springer. 2012

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/2193-9004-1-3
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Article provided by Springer & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA) in its journal IZA Journal of Labor Policy.

Volume (Year): 1 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (December)
Pages: 1-21

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Handle: RePEc:spr:izalpo:v:1:y:2012:i:1:p:1-21:10.1186/2193-9004-1-3
DOI: 10.1186/2193-9004-1-3
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  1. Werner Eichhorst & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2007. "And Then There Were Four...How Many (and Which) Measures of Active Labor Market Policy Do We Still Need?," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 53(3), pages 243-272.
  2. Eichhorst, Werner & Grienberger-Zingerle, Maria & Konle-Seidl, Regina, 2006. "Activation Policies in Germany: From Status Protection to Basic Income Support," IZA Discussion Papers 2514, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Dolls, Mathias & Fuest, Clemens & Peichl, Andreas, 2010. "Automatic stabilisers and economic crisis: US vs Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/10, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  4. Giersch,Herbert & Paqué,Karl-Heinz & Schmieding,Holger, 1994. "The Fading Miracle," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521358699, Junio.
  5. Olga Bohachova & Bernhard Boockmann & Claudia M. Buch, 2011. "Labor Demand During the Crisis: What Happened in Germany?," IAW Discussion Papers 76, Institut für Angewandte Wirtschaftsforschung (IAW).
  6. Cahuc, Pierre & Carcillo, Stéphane, 2011. "Is Short-time Work a Good Method to Keep Unemployment Down?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8214, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Karl BRENKE & Ulf RINNE & Klaus F. ZIMMERMANN, 2013. "Short-time work: The German answer to the Great Recession," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 152(2), pages 287-305, 06.
  8. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "Observations and Conjectures on the U.S. Employment Miracle," NBER Working Papers 6146, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Christophe Hachon, 2010. "Do Beveridgian pension systems increase growth?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 825-831, March.
  10. Eichhorst, Werner & Marx, Paul, 2009. "Reforming German Labor Market Institutions: A Dual Path to Flexibility," IZA Discussion Papers 4100, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Schneider, Hilmar & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2010. "Agenda 2020: Strategies to Achieve Full Employment in Germany," IZA Policy Papers 15, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Olivier Bargain & Herwig Immervoll & Andreas Peichl & Sebastian Siegloch, 2012. "Distributional consequences of labor-demand shocks: the 2008–2009 recession in Germany," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 19(1), pages 118-138, February.
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