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Making the Most of EU Labour Mobility

Listed author(s):
  • Barslund, Mikkel
  • Busse, Matthias

This Task Force report combines the most recent data from Eurostat with national sources to highlight the most significant labour mobility trends within the EU. Overall, the recent recession has not induced previously immobile workers to become more mobile, at least not in the larger member states. Mobility flows have moved away from crisis countries in response to the economic downturn but the desired increase in south-north mobility has not been observed so far. This leads the authors to conclude that successfully fostering mobility within EU15 countries requires tremendous effort. It is important that workers who are willing and able to move are not discouraged from doing so by unnecessary barriers to mobility. Improving the workings of the EURES system and its online job-matching platform; better cooperation of national employment agencies; streamlining the recognition of qualifications; and supporting language training within the EU are important contributions to labour mobility. The authors conclude that the EU is right to defend the free movement of workers. National governments should keep in mind that their ability to tap into an attractive foreign labour supply also hinges upon the perception of how mobile workers are treated in destination countries. If the political imperative requires regulations to be changed, such as the one guiding the coordination of social security, it is essential that no new mobility barriers are put in place.

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File URL: http://www.ceps.eu/system/files/CEPS%20Making%20the%20Most%20of%20Labour%20Mobility%20Oct-3.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for European Policy Studies in its series CEPS Papers with number 9701.

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Length: 52 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2014
Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:9701
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  9. Timo Baas & Herbert Brücker, 2011. "EU Eastern Enlargement: The Benefits from Integration and Free Labour Movement," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 9(2), pages 44-51, 07.
  10. Ruist, Joakim, 2014. "The Fiscal Consequences of Unrestricted Immigration from Romania and Bulgaria," Working Papers in Economics 584, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
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