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Extreme Temperatures and Time-Use in China

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  • Garg, Teevrat

    () (University of California, San Diego)

  • Gibson, Matthew

    () (Williams College)

  • Sun, Fanglin

    () (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract

How do people in developing countries respond to extreme temperatures? Using individual-level panel data over two decades and relying on plausibly exogenous variation in weather, we estimate how extreme temperatures affect time use in China. Extreme temperatures reduce time spent working, and this effect is largest for female farmers. Hot days reduce time spent by women on outdoor chores, but we find no such effects for men. Finally, hot days dramatically reduce time spent on childcare, reflecting large effects on home production. Taken together, our results suggest time use is an important margin of response to extreme temperatures.

Suggested Citation

  • Garg, Teevrat & Gibson, Matthew & Sun, Fanglin, 2019. "Extreme Temperatures and Time-Use in China," IZA Discussion Papers 12372, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12372
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    extreme weather; time use; gender;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs

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