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Extreme Temperatures and Time-Use in China

Author

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  • Garg, Teevrat

    () (University of California, San Diego)

  • Gibson, Matthew

    () (Williams College)

  • Sun, Fanglin

    () (University of California, San Diego)

Abstract

How do people in developing countries respond to extreme temperatures? Using individual-level panel data over two decades and relying on plausibly exogenous variation in weather, we estimate how extreme temperatures affect time use in China. Extreme temperatures reduce time spent working, and this effect is largest for female farmers. Hot days reduce time spent by women on outdoor chores, but we find no such effects for men. Finally, hot days dramatically reduce time spent on childcare, reflecting large effects on home production. Taken together, our results suggest time use is an important margin of response to extreme temperatures.

Suggested Citation

  • Garg, Teevrat & Gibson, Matthew & Sun, Fanglin, 2019. "Extreme Temperatures and Time-Use in China," IZA Discussion Papers 12372, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12372
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Catherine Wolfram & Orie Shelef & Paul Gertler, 2012. "How Will Energy Demand Develop in the Developing World?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 26(1), pages 119-138, Winter.
    2. Olivier DeschĂȘnes & Michael Greenstone, 2011. "Climate Change, Mortality, and Adaptation: Evidence from Annual Fluctuations in Weather in the US," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 152-185, October.
    3. Laurens Cherchye & Bram De Rock & Frederic Vermeulen, 2012. "Married with Children: A Collective Labor Supply Model with Detailed Time Use and Intrahousehold Expenditure Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3377-3405, December.
    4. E. Somanathan & Rohini Somanathan & Anant Sudarsan & Meenu Tewari, 2014. "The Impact of Temperature on Productivity and Labor Supply: Evidence from Indian Manufacturing," Working Papers id:6308, eSocialSciences.
    5. Jonathan Colmer, 2018. "Weather, Labor Reallocation and Industrial Production: Evidence from India," CEP Discussion Papers dp1544, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Alan B. Krueger & Andreas I. Mueller, 2012. "Time Use, Emotional Well-Being, and Unemployment: Evidence from Longitudinal Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 594-599, May.
    7. Christopher B. Barrett & Teevrat Garg & Linden McBride, 2016. "Well-Being Dynamics and Poverty Traps," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 8(1), pages 303-327, October.
    8. Maximilian Auffhammer, 2014. "Cooling China: The Weather Dependence of Air Conditioner Adoption," Frontiers of Economics in China, Higher Education Press, vol. 9(1), pages 70-84, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    extreme weather; time use; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs

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