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Here Comes the Rain Again: Weather and the Intertemporal Substitution of Leisure

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  • Marie Connolly

Abstract

I revisit the intertemporal labor supply framework, using exogenous variations in daily weather to see how time at work varies with rain. In my model, a rainy day is associated with a lower enjoyment of leisure, effectively increasing wages and bringing more hours at work. I test the model using data from the American Time Use Survey, supplemented with daily weather. I find that, on rainy days, men shift on average 30 minutes from leisure to work. Computations give a rough estimate of the intertemporal elasticity of labor supply of around 0.01, in line with the rest of the literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Marie Connolly, 2008. "Here Comes the Rain Again: Weather and the Intertemporal Substitution of Leisure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 73-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:p:73-100
    DOI: 10.1086/522067
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Colin Camerer & Linda Babcock & George Loewenstein & Richard Thaler, 1997. "Labor Supply of New York City Cabdrivers: One Day at a Time," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 407-441.
    2. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1996. "Workdays, Workhours, and Work Schedules: Evidence for the United States and Germany," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number www, November.
    3. Gerald S. Oettinger, 1999. "An Empirical Analysis of the Daily Labor Supply of Stadium Vendors," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 360-392, April.
    4. Roback, Jennifer, 1982. "Wages, Rents, and the Quality of Life," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(6), pages 1257-1278, December.
    5. Henry S. Farber, 2004. "Reference-Dependent Preferences and Labor Supply: The Case of New York City Taxi Drivers," Working Papers 876, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    6. Biddle, Jeff E, 1988. "Intertemporal Substitution and Hours Restrictions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 347-351, May.
    7. Henry S. Farber, 2004. "Reference-Dependent Preferences and Labor Supply: The Case of New York City Taxi Drivers," Working Papers 876, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    8. Lucas, Robert E, Jr & Rapping, Leonard A, 1969. "Real Wages, Employment, and Inflation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 721-754, Sept./Oct.
    9. John C. Ham & Kevin T. Reilly, 2002. "Testing Intertemporal Substitution, Implicit Contracts, and Hours Restriction Models of the Labor Market Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 905-927, September.
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