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Gender, Time Use, and Change: The Impact of the Cut Flower Industry in Ecuador

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  • Constance Newman

Abstract

This article uses survey data from Ecuador to examine the effects of women's employment on the allocation of paid and unpaid labor within the household. I compare a region with high demand for female labor with a similar region in which demand for female labor is low. The comparison suggests that market labor opportunities for women have no effect on women's total time in labor but increase men's time in unpaid labor. The increase in men's time in unpaid work reflects women's increased bargaining power in the home. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Constance Newman, 2002. "Gender, Time Use, and Change: The Impact of the Cut Flower Industry in Ecuador," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(3), pages 375-395, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:16:y:2002:i:3:p:375-395
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    Cited by:

    1. Johnston, Deborah & Stevano, Sara & Malapit, Hazel J. & Hull, Elizabeth & Kadiyala, Suneetha, 2015. "Agriculture, gendered time use, and nutritional outcomes: A systematic review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1456, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Golan, Jennifer & Lay, Jann, 2008. "More coffee, more cigarettes? Coffee market liberalisation, gender, and bargaining in Uganda," Kiel Working Papers 1402, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Quentin Wodon & Elena Bardasi, 2006. "Measuring Time Poverty and Analyzing its Determinants: Concepts and Application to Guinea," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(12), pages 1-7.
    4. World Bank, 2012. "Toward Gender Equality in East Asia and the Pacific : A Companion to the World Development Report," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12598.
    5. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.
    6. Lay, Jann & Golan, Jennifer, 2009. "The Impact of Agricultural Market Liberalisation from a Gender Perspective: Evidence from Uganda," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Frankfurt a.M. 2009 20, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    7. Juan Carlos, Campaña & J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina, 2017. "Differences between self-employed and employed mothers in balancing family and work responsibilities: Evidence from Latin American countries," MPRA Paper 77964, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Supriya Garikipati, 2012. "Microcredit and Women's Empowerment: Through the Lens of Time-Use Data from Rural India," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 43(3), pages 719-750, May.
    9. Edmonds & Eric V. & Pavcnik, Nina, 2004. "Product market integration and household labor supply in a poor economy: evidence from Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3234, The World Bank.
    10. Juan Carlos, Campaña & J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina, 2017. "Self-employment and educational childcare time: Evidence from Latin America," MPRA Paper 77360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Yassaman Saadatmand & Michael Toma, 2008. "IMF-Induced Structural Adjustment Programs and Women in Ecuador," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 14(2), pages 181-190, May.

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