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The Effect of U.S. Stress Tests on Monetary Policy Spillovers to Emerging Markets

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Listed:
  • Liu, Emily
  • Niepmann, Friederike
  • Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim

Abstract

This paper shows that monetary policy and prudential policies interact. U.S. banks issue more commercial and industrial loans to emerging market borrowers when U.S. monetary policy eases. The effect is less pronounced for banks that are more constrained through the U.S. bank stress tests, reflected in a lower minimum capital ratio in the severely adverse scenario. This suggests that monetary policy spillovers depend on banks' capital constraints. In particular, during a period of quantitative easing when liquidity is abundant, banks are more flexible, and the scope for adjusting lending is larger when they have a bigger capital buffer. We conjecture that bank lending to emerging markets during the zero-lower bound period would have been even higher had the United States not introduced stress tests for their banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Liu, Emily & Niepmann, Friederike & Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim, 2019. "The Effect of U.S. Stress Tests on Monetary Policy Spillovers to Emerging Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 14128, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:14128
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Friederike Niepmann & Tim Schmidt-Eisenlohr, 2017. "Foreign Currency Loans and Credit Risk: Evidence from U.S. Banks," CESifo Working Paper Series 6700, CESifo.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    emerging markets; monetary policy spillovers; stress tests; U.S. bank lending;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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