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The Reversal Interest Rate

Author

Listed:
  • Markus K. Brunnermeier

    (Department of Economics, Princeton University (E-mail: markus@princeton.edu))

  • Yann Koby

    (Department of Economics, Princeton University (E-mail: ykoby@princeton.edu))

Abstract

The reversal interest rate is the rate at which accommodative monetary policy reverses and becomes contractionary for lending. Its determinants are 1) banks' fixed-income holdings, 2) the strictness of capital constraints, 3) the degree of pass-through to deposit rates, and 4) the initial capitalization of banks. Quantitative easing increases the reversal interest rate and should only be employed after interest rate cuts are exhausted. Over time the reversal interest rate creeps up since asset revaluation fades out as fixed-income holdings mature while net interest income stays low. We calibrate a New Keynesian model that embeds our banking frictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus K. Brunnermeier & Yann Koby, 2019. "The Reversal Interest Rate," IMES Discussion Paper Series 19-E-06, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  • Handle: RePEc:ime:imedps:19-e-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Lower Bound; Negative Rates; Banking;

    JEL classification:

    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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