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Leaning Against Windy Bank Lending

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Melina
  • Stefania Villa

Abstract

Using an estimated dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model with banking, this paper first provides evidence that monetary policy reacted to bank loan growth in the US during the Great Moderation. It then shows that the optimized simple interest-rate rule features virtually no response to the growth of bank credit. However, the welfare loss associated to the empirical responsiveness is small. The sources of business cycle fluctuations are crucial in determining whether a “leaning-against-the-wind” policy is optimal or not. In fact, the predominant role of supply shocks in the model gives rise to a trade-off between inflation and financial stabilization.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Melina & Stefania Villa, 2015. "Leaning Against Windy Bank Lending," CESifo Working Paper Series 5317, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5317
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yunus Aksoy & Henrique S. Basso & Javier Coto-Martinez, 2013. "Lending Relationships And Monetary Policy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(1), pages 368-393, January.
    2. Vasco Cúrdia & Michael Woodford, 2010. "Credit Spreads and Monetary Policy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 3-35, September.
    3. Schmitt-Grohe, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2007. "Optimal simple and implementable monetary and fiscal rules," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(6), pages 1702-1725, September.
    4. Frank Smets & Rafael Wouters, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles: A Bayesian DSGE Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 586-606, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Verona, Fabio & Martins, Manuel M.F. & Drumond, Inês, 2017. "Financial shocks, financial stability, and optimal Taylor rules," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PB), pages 187-207.
    2. Kiley, Michael T. & Sim, Jae, 2017. "Optimal monetary and macroprudential policies: Gains and pitfalls in a model of financial intermediation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PB), pages 232-259.
    3. Vivien Lewis & Stefania Villa, 2016. "The Interdependence of Monetary and Macroprudential Policy under the Zero Lower Bound," Working Paper Research 310, National Bank of Belgium.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    lending relationships; augmented Taylor rule; Bayesian estimation; optimal policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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