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Deep habits, price rigidities and the consumption response to Government spending

This paper presents the novel implications of introducing price rigidities into a model of good-specific habit formation, for the response of private consumption following a positive government spending shock. With 'deep' habits in demand, the price elasticity of demand rises after the fiscal expansion and it is optimal for the firm to lower the mark-up while increasing production. This in turn raises the demand for labour and the real wage rises. Consequently, agents raise consumption at the expense of leisure and overcome the negative wealth effect of the fiscal shock. We show that increasing price stickiness in a model with deep habits hinders the crowding-in of consumption. If the degree of price stickiness is high enough, consumption is crowded out by government spending. These dynamics are in stark contrast to those in traditional models where price rigidities are known to weaken the crowding-out of consumption.

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Paper provided by Reserve Bank of New Zealand in its series Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series with number DP2013/03.

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Length: 35 p.
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbdps:2013/03
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  1. Davig, Troy & Leeper, Eric M., 2009. "Monetary-Fiscal Policy Interactions and Fiscal Stimulus," CEPR Discussion Papers 7509, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Cantore, Cristiano & Levine, Paul & Melina, Giovanni & Yang, Bo, 2012. "A fiscal stimulus with deep habits and optimal monetary policy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 348-353.
  3. Morten Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martin Uribe, 2004. "Deep Habits," NBER Working Papers 10261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Smets, Frank & Wouters, Raf, 2007. "Shocks and frictions in US business cycles: a Bayesian DSGE approach," Working Paper Series 0722, European Central Bank.
  5. Winkler, Roland & Lewis, Vivien, 2013. "Fiscal Stimulus and the Extensive Margin," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79947, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  6. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe & Martín Uribe & Lenno Uuskula, 2008. "Deep Habits and the Dynamic Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks," Economics Working Papers ECO2008/40, European University Institute.
  7. Jacob, Punnoose & Peersman, Gert, 2013. "Dissecting the dynamics of the US trade balance in an estimated equilibrium model," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 302-315.
  8. Rotemberg, Julio J, 1982. "Monopolistic Price Adjustment and Aggregate Output," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 517-31, October.
  9. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2011. "A Fiscal Stimulus and Jobless Recovery," School of Economics Discussion Papers 1111, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  10. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 1999. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," NBER Working Papers 7269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Sarah Zubairy, 2010. "On Fiscal Multipliers: Estimates from a Medium Scale DSGE Model," Working Papers 10-30, Bank of Canada.
  12. Linnemann, Ludger & Schabert, Andreas, 2003. " Fiscal Policy in the New Neoclassical Synthesis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(6), pages 911-29, December.
  13. Punnoose Jacob, 2013. "Deep habits, price rigidities and the consumption response to Government spending," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2013/03, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  14. G. Peersman & R. Straub, 2006. "Putting the New Keynesian Model to a Test," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 06/375, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  15. Florin Bilbiie, 2011. "Non-Separable Preferences, Frisch Labor Supply and the Consumption Multiplier of Government Spending: One Solution to a Fiscal Policy Puzzle," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00622872, HAL.
  16. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.
  17. Ravn, Morten O. & Schmitt-Grohé, Stephanie & Uribe, Martín, 2012. "Consumption, government spending, and the real exchange rate," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 215-234.
  18. Florin O. Bilbiie, 2011. "Nonseparable Preferences, Frisch Labor Supply, and the Consumption Multiplier of Government Spending: One Solution to a Fiscal Policy Puzzle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 221-251, 02.
  19. Zubairy, Sarah, 2010. "Deep Habits, Nominal Rigidities and Interest Rate Rules," MPRA Paper 26053, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  20. Furlanetto, Francesco, 2011. "Fiscal stimulus and the role of wage rigidity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 512-527, April.
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