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Economic Openness and Fiscal Multipliers

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  • Marco Riguzzi
  • Philipp Wegmueller

Abstract

Recent empirical findings attribute a central role to the degree of economic openness to determine the size of the fiscal multiplier. See, for instance, Ilzetzki et al. (2013) [How big (small?) are fiscal multipliers? Journal of Monetary Economics, 60(2), 239–254]. However, traditional macroeconomic models have difficulties to account for this evidence. By introducing ‘deep-habit’ formation into a New Keynesian small open economy model, this paper provides a theoretical framework which is able to attest for the new empirical evidence. Deep habits give rise to counter-cyclical firm markups, which are crucial to generate effects of openness on the fiscal multiplier as found in the data. We study three dimensions of economic openness: exchange rate flexibility, trade openness, and capital mobility. In line with the empirical findings, we report a negative relationship between measures of economic openness and the fiscal multiplier.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Riguzzi & Philipp Wegmueller, 2017. "Economic Openness and Fiscal Multipliers," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 1-35, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:31:y:2017:i:1:p:1-35
    DOI: 10.1080/10168737.2016.1204337
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    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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