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Deep Habits, Nominal Rigidities and Interest Rate Rules

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  • Zubairy, Sarah

Abstract

This paper explores how the introduction of deep habits in a standard new-Keynesian model affects the properties of widely used interest rate rules. In particular, an interest rate rule satisfying the Taylor principle is no longer a su±cient condition to guarantee determinacy. Including interest rate smoothing and a response to output deviations from steady state significantly improve the regions of determinacy. However, under all the simple interest rate rules considered here with contemporaneous variables, determinacy is not guaranteed for very high degree of deep habits. The intuition behind these findings is tied to how deep habits give rise to counter-cyclical markups, a property that makes it an appealing feature in the study of demand shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Zubairy, Sarah, 2010. "Deep Habits, Nominal Rigidities and Interest Rate Rules," MPRA Paper 26053, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26053
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/26053/1/MPRA_paper_26053.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.
    2. Richard Clarida & Jordi Galí & Mark Gertler, 2000. "Monetary Policy Rules and Macroeconomic Stability: Evidence and Some Theory," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(1), pages 147-180.
    3. Jordi Galí & J. David López-Salido, 2003. "Rule-of-Thumb Consumers and the Design of Interest Rate Rules," Working Papers 104, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Athanasios Orphanides, 2001. "Monetary Policy Rules Based on Real-Time Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 964-985, September.
    5. Zubairy, Sarah, 2010. "Explaining the Effects of Government Spending Shocks," MPRA Paper 26051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Michael Woodford, 2001. "The Taylor Rule and Optimal Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 232-237, May.
    7. Morten Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2006. "Deep Habits," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 195-218.
    8. Sveen, Tommy & Weinke, Lutz, 2005. "New perspectives on capital, sticky prices, and the Taylor principle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 123(1), pages 21-39, July.
    9. Taylor, John B., 1993. "Discretion versus policy rules in practice," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 195-214, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.
    2. Leith, Campbell & Moldovan, Ioana & Rossi, Raffaele, 2015. "Monetary and fiscal policy under deep habits," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 55-74.
    3. Punnoose Jacob, 2015. "Deep Habits, Price Rigidities, and the Consumption Response to Government Spending," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(2-3), pages 481-510, March.
    4. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taylor principle; interest rate rules; sticky prices; deep habits;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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