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Explaining the Effects of Government Spending Shocks

  • Zubairy, Sarah

The objective of this paper is to identify and explain effects of a government spending shock. After accounting for large military events, I find that in response to a structural unanticipated government spending shock, output, hours, consumption and wages all rise, whereas investment falls on impact. I construct and estimate a dynamic general equilibrium model featuring deep habit formation and show that it successfully explains these effects. In particular, deep habits give rise to countercyclical markups and thus act as transmission mechanism for the effects of government spending shocks on private consumption and wages. In addition, I show that deep habits significantly improve the fit of the model compared to a model with habit formation at the level of aggregate goods.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/26051/1/MPRA_paper_26051.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 26051.

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Date of creation: 24 May 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26051
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  1. Olivier Blanchard & Roberto Perotti, 1999. "An Empirical Characterization of the Dynamic Effects of Changes in Government Spending and Taxes on Output," NBER Working Papers 7269, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Florin O. Bilbiie, 2009. "Nonseparable Preferences, Fiscal Policy Puzzles, and Inferior Goods," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(2-3), pages 443-450, 03.
  3. King, R.G. & Baxter, M., 1990. "Fiscal Policy In General Equilibrium," RCER Working Papers 244, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2001. "Nominal rigidities and the dynamic effects of a shock to monetary policy," Working Paper Series WP-01-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  5. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe, 2004. "Deep Habits," 2004 Meeting Papers 208, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Hafedh Bouakez & Nooman Rebei, 2003. "Why Does Private Consumption Rise After a Government Spending Shock?," Working Papers 03-43, Bank of Canada.
  7. Chernozhukov, Victor & Hong, Han, 2003. "An MCMC approach to classical estimation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 293-346, August.
  8. Craig Burnside & Martin Eichenbaum & Jonas Fisher, 2003. "Fiscal Shocks and Their Consequences," NBER Working Papers 9772, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Morten O. Ravn & Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2007. "Explaining the Effects of Government Spending Shocks on Consumption and the Real Exchange Rate," NBER Working Papers 13328, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. repec:eui:euiwps:eco2007/23 is not listed on IDEAS
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