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Deep versus superficial habit: It’s all in the persistence

Author

Listed:
  • Cristiano Cantore

    (University of Surrey)

  • Paul Levine

    (University of Surrey)

  • Giovanni Melina

    (City University London)

Abstract

Bayesian estimation is employed to investigate whether deep as opposed to superficial habit improves the fit of a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model. If the stock of superficial habit features the additional persistence typical of deep habit, the two specifications are virtually as good. Introducing deep habit in public consumption does not improve the model’s fit.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2014. "Deep versus superficial habit: It’s all in the persistence," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0714, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0714
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    File URL: https://repec.som.surrey.ac.uk/2014/DP07-14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Albonico, Alice & Paccagnini, Alessia & Tirelli, Patrizio, 2016. "In search of the Euro area fiscal stance," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(PB), pages 254-264.
    2. Anna Kormilitsina & Sarah Zubairy, 2015. "Propagation Mechanisms for Government Spending Shocks: A Bayesian Comparison," EcoMod2015 8646, EcoMod.
    3. repec:eee:dyncon:v:81:y:2017:i:c:p:140-161 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Punnoose Jacob, 2015. "Deep Habits, Price Rigidities, and the Consumption Response to Government Spending," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(2-3), pages 481-510, March.
    5. Di Pace, Federico & Villa, Stefania, 2016. "Factor complementarity and labour market dynamics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 70-112.
    6. Albonico, Alice & Paccagnini, Alessia & Tirelli, Patrizio, 2017. "Great recession, slow recovery and muted fiscal policies in the US," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 140-161.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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