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What does a monetary policy shock do? An international analysis with multiple filters

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  • Efrem Castelnuovo

    () (University of Padova)

Abstract

What does a monetary policy shock do? We answer this question by estimating a new-Keynesian monetary policy DSGE model for a number of economies with a variety of empirical proxies of the business cycle. The effects of two different policy shocks, an unexpected interest rate hike conditional on a constant inflation target and an unpredicted drift in the inflation target, are scrutinized. Filter-specific Bayesian impulse responses are contrasted with those obtained by combining multiple business cycle indicators. Our results document the substantial uncertainty surrounding the estimated effects of these two policy shocks across a number of countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Efrem Castelnuovo, 2012. "What does a monetary policy shock do? An international analysis with multiple filters," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0145, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  • Handle: RePEc:pad:wpaper:0145
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    Cited by:

    1. Doko Tchatoka, Firmin & Groshenny, Nicolas & Haque, Qazi & Weder, Mark, 2017. "Monetary policy and indeterminacy after the 2001 slump," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 83-95.
    2. Efrem Castelnuovo, 2013. "What does a Monetary Policy Shock Do? An International Analysis with Multiple Filters," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(5), pages 759-784, October.
    3. Efrem Castelnuovo, 2016. "Monetary policy shocks and Cholesky VARs: an assessment for the Euro area," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 383-414, March.
    4. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2014. "Deep versus superficial habit: It’s all in the persistence," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0714, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    5. Caraiani, Petre, 2015. "Estimating DSGE models across time and frequency," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 33-49.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multiple filtering; business cycle proxies; new-Keynesian business cycle model; trend inflation; monetary policy shocks.;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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