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What does a monetary policy shock do? An international analysis with multiple filters

  • Efrem Castelnuovo

    ()

    (University of Padova)

What does a monetary policy shock do? We answer this question by estimating a new-Keynesian monetary policy DSGE model for a number of economies with a variety of empirical proxies of the business cycle. The effects of two different policy shocks, an unexpected interest rate hike conditional on a constant inflation target and an unpredicted drift in the inflation target, are scrutinized. Filter-specific Bayesian impulse responses are contrasted with those obtained by combining multiple business cycle indicators. Our results document the substantial uncertainty surrounding the estimated effects of these two policy shocks across a number of countries.

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Paper provided by Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno" in its series "Marco Fanno" Working Papers with number 0145.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: May 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pad:wpaper:0145
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