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Large banks, loan rate markup and monetary policy

Author

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  • Vincenzo Cuciniello

    () (Bank of Italy)

  • Federico M. Signoretti

    () (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

This paper studies the implications of introducing large monopolistic banks, which can affect macroeconomic outcomes and thus the response of monetary policy to inflation, in a model with a collateral constraint linking the borrowers� credit capacity to the value of their durable assets. First, we find that strategic interaction generates a countercyclical loan spread, which amplifies the impact of monetary and technology shocks on the real economy. This type of financial accelerator adds up to the one due to financial frictions and is crucially related to the existence of non-atomistic banks. Second, the level of the spread and the degree of amplification are positively related to the level of entrepreneurs� leverage, reflecting the fact that higher leverage implies greater elasticity of the policy rate to changes in loan rates, which in turn increases banks� market power. Third, we find that amplification is stronger the more aggressive the central bank�s response to inflation, as measured by the inflation coefficient in the Taylor rule.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincenzo Cuciniello & Federico M. Signoretti, 2014. "Large banks, loan rate markup and monetary policy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 987, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_987_14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Borin & Michele Mancini, 2016. "Foreign direct investment and firm performance: an empirical analysis of Italian firms," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 152(4), pages 705-732, November.
    2. Giovanni Melina & Stefania Villa, 2015. "Leaning Against Windy Bank Lending," CESifo Working Paper Series 5317, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Giovanni Melina & Stefania Villa, 2018. "Leaning Against Windy Bank Lending," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 460-482, January.
    4. Aysun, Uluc, 2016. "Bank size and macroeconomic shock transmission: Does the credit channel operate through large or small banks?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 117-139.
    5. repec:fip:fedreq:00056 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Cao, Jin & Chollete, Lorán, 2017. "Monetary policy and financial stability in the long run: A simple game-theoretic approach," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 125-142.
    7. Eduardo Dávila & Ansgar Walther, 2017. "Does Size Matter? Bailouts with Large and Small Banks," NBER Working Papers 24132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    large banks; bank markup; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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