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Age Biased Technical and Organisational Change, Training and Employment Prospects of Older Workers

  • Behaghel, L.
  • Caroli, E.
  • Roger, M.

We analyze the role of training in mitigating the negative impact of technical and organizational changes on the employment of older workers. Using a panel of French firms in the late 1990s, our empirical analysis confirms that new technologies and some innovative workplace practices are biased against older workers. The use of the Internet and the adoption of computer networks tend to increase the wage share of middle-aged workers and to reduce the share of workers older than 50. By contrast, the reduction of the number of hierarchical layers is favourable to older workers. Training contributes to protect older workers in terms of employment and/or of wages.

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File URL: http://www.banque-france.fr/uploads/tx_bdfdocumentstravail/DT-431_01.pdf
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Paper provided by Banque de France in its series Working papers with number 431.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:431
Contact details of provider: Postal: Banque de France 31 Rue Croix des Petits Champs LABOLOG - 49-1404 75049 PARIS
Web page: http://www.banque-france.fr/

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  1. M. Picchio & J. C. Van Ours, 2011. "Retaining through Training Even for Older Workers," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/748, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  2. Roger, Muriel & Aubert, Patrick & Caroli, Eve, 2006. "New technologies, organisation and age: firm-level evidence," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10051, Paris Dauphine University.
  3. Michael Beckmann, 2007. "Age-Biased Technological and Organizational Change: Firm-Level Evidence and Management Implications," Working papers 2007/05, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  4. Bartel, Ann P & Sicherman, Nachum, 1993. "Technological Change and Retirement Decisions of Older Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 162-83, January.
  5. Van Reenen, John & Caroli, Eve, 2001. "Skill-Biased Organizational Change? Evidence from a panel of British and French establishments," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/10093, Paris Dauphine University.
  6. Leora Friedberg, 2003. "The Impact of Technological Change on Older Workers: Evidence from Data on Computer Use," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(3), pages 511-529, April.
  7. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, And The Demand For Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376, February.
  8. Schleife, Katrin, 2008. "IT Training and Employability of Older Workers," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-021, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  9. Borghans,Lex & Weel,Bas,ter, 2002. "Do Older Workers Have More Trouble Using a Computer Than Younger Workers?," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  10. Andrea Bassanini, 2006. "Training, wages and employment security: an empirical analysis on European data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(8), pages 523-527.
  11. Katrin Schleife, 2006. "Computer Use and Employment Status of Older Workers - An Analysis Based on Individual Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(2), pages 325-348, 06.
  12. Leora Friedberg, 2001. "The Impact of Technological Change on Older Workers: Evidence from Data on Computer Use," NBER Working Papers 8297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Dag Rønningen, 2007. "Are technological change and organizational change biased against older workers? Firm-level evidence," Discussion Papers 512, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  14. Younghwan Song, 2009. "Training, Technological Changes, and Displacement," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 201-218, September.
  15. Michele Boldrin & Juan J. Dolado & Juan F. Jimeno & Franco Peracchi, 1999. "The future of pensions in Europe," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 14(29), pages 287-320, October.
  16. Torbjørn Hægeland & Dag Rønningen & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2007. "Adapt or withdraw? Evidence on technological changes and early retirement using matched worker-firm data," Discussion Papers 509, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  17. repec:fda:fdaddt:99-08 is not listed on IDEAS
  18. P. Biscourp & B. Crépon & T. Heckel & N. Riedinger, 2002. "How do firms respond to cheaper computers? Microeconometric evidence for France based on a production function approach," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2002-05, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
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