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Computer Use and Employment Status of Older Workers — An Analysis Based on Individual Data

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  • Katrin Schleife

Abstract

Abstract. This paper analyses the determinants of computer use by male employees and estimates the impact of computer use on the employment status for older workers, based on individual data from the German Socio‐Economic Panel. In line with previous research on the diffusion of new technologies, a strong and negative relationship between the age of workers and computer use is found. The correlation of educational level and occupational status on computer use is significantly positive. However, the estimated impact of computer use on the change in employment status of older workers becomes insignificant when controlling for individual and firm‐specific characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Katrin Schleife, 2006. "Computer Use and Employment Status of Older Workers — An Analysis Based on Individual Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(2), pages 325-348, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:20:y:2006:i:2:p:325-348
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2006.00341.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, 1999. "Money for Nothing and Your Chips for Free?: The Anatomy of the PC Wage Differential," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 178, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bertschek Irene & Meyer Jenny, 2009. "Do Older Workers Lower IT-Enabled Productivity?: Firm-Level Evidence from Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(2-3), pages 327-342, April.
    2. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:6:p:1125-1132 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Boockmann, Bernhard & Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian, 2018. "Specific measures for older employees and late career employment," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 159-174.
    4. Paolo Guerrieri & Sara Bentivegna (ed.), 2011. "The Economic Impact of Digital Technologies," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14361, November.
    5. Stephan Humpert & Christian Pfeifer, 2011. "Explaining Age and Gender Differences in Employment Rates: A Labor Supply Side Perspective," Working Paper Series in Economics 214, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    6. Federico Biagi & ?Danilo Cavapozzi & ?Raffaele Miniaci, 2007. "Technology, Skills and Retirement," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0042, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    7. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7243 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. John S. Heywood & Uwe Jirjahn, 2016. "The hiring and employment of older workers in Germany: a comparative perspective
      [Die Beschäftigung und Neueinstellung älterer Arbeitnehmer in Deutschland: Eine vergleichende Perspektive]
      ," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 49(4), pages 349-366, December.
    9. Luc Behaghel & Eve Caroli & Muriel Roger, 2014. "Age-biased Technical and Organizational Change, Training and Employment Prospects of Older Workers," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(322), pages 368-389, April.
    10. John S. Heywood & Uwe Jirjahn, 2015. "The German Labor Market for Older Workers in Comparative Perspective," Research Papers in Economics 2015-02, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    11. Orlowski, Robert & Riphahn, Regina T., 2008. "Seniority in Germany: New evidence on returns to tenure for male full-time workers," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 41(2/3), pages 139-155.
    12. Jenny Meyer, 2011. "Workforce age and technology adoption in small and medium-sized service firms," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 305-324, October.
    13. repec:ehu:cuader:21770 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Meyer, Jenny, 2008. "The Adoption of New Technologies and the Age Structure of the Workforce," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-045, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    15. Valeria Cirillo & Rinaldo Evangelista & Dario Guarascio & Matteo Sostero, 2019. "Digitalization, routineness and employment: An exploration on Italian task-based data," LEM Papers Series 2019/18, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

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