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Employment transitions and computer use of older workers

Author

Listed:
  • Federico Biagi

    () (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche - Universita degli Studi di Padova)

  • Danilo Cavapozzi

    () (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche - Universita degli Studi di Padova)

  • Raffaele Miniaci

    () (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche - Università di Brescia)

Abstract

Our empirical analysis studies the impact of computer use on out of employment transitions of older workers, disentangling the effect of using a PC at work from that of being PC literate. Data are drawn from the 2000, 2002 and 2004 waves of the Bank of Italy Survey on Household Income and Wealth. We provide empirical evidence that, even controlling for a wide set of covariates, older employees who use a PC at work have a higher probability of remaining employed in the future. However, our results also indicate that, once PC literacy is controlled for, the use of a PC at work decreases only marginally the risk of becoming not employed (i.e. the effect is smaller than the one registered when we do not control for PC literacy)

Suggested Citation

  • Federico Biagi & Danilo Cavapozzi & Raffaele Miniaci, 2011. "Employment transitions and computer use of older workers," Post-Print hal-00741504, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-00741504
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.610748
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00741504
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miniaci Raffaele & Parisi Maria Laura, 2006. "Social Interactions and the Digital Divide: Identification and Policy Implications," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, October.
    2. Bartel, Ann P & Sicherman, Nachum, 1993. "Technological Change and Retirement Decisions of Older Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 162-183, January.
    3. Leora Friedberg, 2003. "The Impact of Technological Change on Older Workers: Evidence from Data on Computer Use," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(3), pages 511-529, April.
    4. Jeff Borland & Joseph Hirschberg & Jenny Lye, 2004. "Computer knowledge and earnings: evidence for Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(17), pages 1979-1993.
    5. Benoit Dostie & Rajshri Jayaraman & Mathieu Trepanier, 2010. "What (if any) are the returns to computer use?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(30), pages 3903-3912.
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    Cited by:

    1. Boockmann, Bernhard & Fries, Jan & Göbel, Christian, 2018. "Specific measures for older employees and late career employment," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 159-174.
    2. Danilo Cavapozzi & Chiara Dal Bianco, 2020. "Does retirement decrease the familiarity with ICT of older individuals?," Working Papers 2020:01, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".

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    Keywords

    Social Sciences & Humanities;

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