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Nouvelles Technologies et Nouvelles Formes d'Organisation du Travail : Quelles conséquences pour l'emploi des salariés âgés ?

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  • Aubert Patrick
  • Caroli Eve
  • Roger Muriel

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationships between new technologies, innovative workplace practices and the age structure of the workforce in a static labour demand framework. As a first step, we assume that, in the short run, the only variable factor is the number of workers in different age groups. We then assume, as a second step that the number of workers by age and skill group may vary. The data we use come from several sources: the Changements Organisationnels et Informatisation survey (COI); the Déclarations Annuelles des Données Sociales (DADS) and the Bénéfices Réels Normaux database (BRN). We find evidence that the wage-bill share of older workers is lower in innovative firms. This age bias affects is also evidenced within occupational groups, thus suggesting that skills do not completely protect workers against the labour-market consequences of ageing..

Suggested Citation

  • Aubert Patrick & Caroli Eve & Roger Muriel, 2005. "Nouvelles Technologies et Nouvelles Formes d'Organisation du Travail : Quelles conséquences pour l'emploi des salariés âgés ?," Research Unit Working Papers 0506, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
  • Handle: RePEc:lea:leawpi:0506
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Luc Behaghel & Nathalie Greenan, 2005. "Training and Age-Biased Technical Change : Evidence from French Micro Data," Working Papers 2005-06, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    2. Aubert Patrick & Caroli Eve & Roger Muriel, 2005. "New Technologies, Workplace Organisation and the Age Structure of the Workforce: Firm-Level Evidence," Research Unit Working Papers 0505, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
    3. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2002. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization, and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 339-376.
    4. James Heckman, 2011. "Policies to foster human capital," Voprosy obrazovaniya / Educational Studies Moscow, National Research University Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 73-137.
    5. David Blanchflower & Simon Burgess, 1998. "New Technology And Jobs: Comparative Evidence From A Two Country Study," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2-4), pages 109-138.
    6. Michel Gollac & Nathalie Greenan & Sylvie Hamon-Cholet, 2000. "L'informatisation de l'« ancienne » économie : nouvelles machines, nouvelles organisations et nouveaux travailleurs," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 339(1), pages 171-201.
    7. repec:dau:papers:123456789/10093 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Nathalie Greenan, 2003. "Organisational change, technology, employment and skills: an empirical study of French manufacturing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 287-316, March.
    9. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-397.
    10. Eve Caroli & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Skill-Biased Organizational Change? Evidence from A Panel of British and French Establishments," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1449-1492.
    11. Borghans, L. & ter Weel, B.J., 2002. "Do older workers have more trouble using a computer than younger workers?," ROA Research Memorandum 1E, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    12. Patrick Aubert & Eve Caroli & Muriel Roger, 2006. "New technologies, organisation and age: firm-level evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(509), pages 73-93, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Danièle Guillemot & Aurélie Peyrin, 2010. "Les salariés de plus de 50 ans et l'informatique : Une comparaison public-privé," Working Papers 2010-18, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    2. Sandrine Levasseur, 2008. "Progrès technologique et employabilité des seniors," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(3), pages 155-184.
    3. Anne Sonnet & Hilde Olsen & Thomas Manfredi, 2014. "Towards More Inclusive Ageing and Employment Policies: The Lessons from France, The Netherlands, Norway and Switzerland," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(4), pages 315-339, December.
    4. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/6144 is not listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    new work practices; technology; older workers; labour demand;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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