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Security Is Like Oxygen: Evidence From Uganda

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  • Zhang, Xiaobo

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, Uganda has been one of Africa's fastest growing countries. However, at the sub-national level, growth has been uneven due to civil conflict in the northern region. Using a panel of household and community level data, this paper examines the links between security and economic growth. It is found that security is a pre-condition for successful economic development and that there is in fact a threshold level of security below which public investments in infrastructure and education have little impact on growth. Only when security exceeds this threshold do public investments stimulate economic growth. Economists and policy advisors living in peaceful countries often prescribe economic policies that hinge on the assumption of good security. In this manner, security, like oxygen, is taken for granted.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Xiaobo, 2004. "Security Is Like Oxygen: Evidence From Uganda," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20384, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20384
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20384
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Easterly, 2002. "The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550423, January.
    2. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
    3. Frances Stewart, 2003. "Conflict and the Millennium Development Goals," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 325-351.
    4. Durlauf, Steven N & Johnson, Paul A, 1995. "Multiple Regimes and Cross-Country Growth Behaviour," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(4), pages 365-384, Oct.-Dec..
    5. Shenggen Fan & Xiaobo Zhang, 2008. "Public Expenditure, Growth and Poverty Reduction in Rural Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 20(3), pages 466-496.
    6. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
    7. Dercon, Stefan, 2004. "Growth and shocks: evidence from rural Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 309-329, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Resnick, Danielle & Birner, Regina, 2005. "Does Good Governance Contribute to Pro-poor Growth?: A Conceptual Framework and Empirical Evidence from Cross-Country Studies," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 5, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    2. World Bank, 2005. "Agriculture and Achieving the Millennium Development Goals," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8455, The World Bank.
    3. Benin, Sam & Mugarura, Samuel, 2006. "Determinants of change in household-level consumption and poverty in Uganda, 1992/93-1999/00:," DSGD discussion papers 27, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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