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Structural Differences in Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Nalan Basturk

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Richard Paap

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

  • Dick van Dijk

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

This paper addresses heterogeneity in determinants of economic growth in a data-driven way. Instead of defining groups of countries with different growth characteristics a priori, based on, for example, geographical location, we use a finite mixture panel model and endogenous clustering to examine cross-country differences and similarities in the effects of growth determinants. Applying this approach to an annual unbalanced panel of 59 countries in Asia, Latin and Middle America and Africa for the period 1971-2000, we can identify two groups of countries in terms of distinct growth structures. The structural differences between the country groups mainly stem from different effects of investment, openness measures and government share in the economy. Furthermore, the detected segmentation of countries does not match with conventional classifications in the literature. This discussion paper resulted in a publication in Applied Economics (2013). Volume 44, pages 119-134.

Suggested Citation

  • Nalan Basturk & Richard Paap & Dick van Dijk, 2008. "Structural Differences in Economic Growth," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-085/4, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20080085
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    17. Paap, Richard & Franses, Philip Hans & van Dijk, Dick, 2005. "Does Africa grow slower than Asia, Latin America and the Middle East? Evidence from a new data-based classification method," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 553-570, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2011. "Econometrics For Grumblers: A New Look At The Literature On Cross‐Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 109-155, February.
    2. Morier, Bruno & Teles, Vladimir Kühl, 2016. "A Time-Varying Markov-Switching Model For Economic Growth," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 1550-1580, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; parameter heterogeneities; latent class models; panel time series;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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