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Determinants Of Democracy

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  • Barro, Robert

Abstract

A panel study of over 100 countries from 1960 to 1995 finds that improvements in the standard of living predict increases in democracy, as measured by a subjective indicator of political freedom. Specifically, the propensity for democracy rises with per capita GDP, primary schooling, and a smaller gap between male and female primary attainment. For a given standard of living, democracy tends to fall with urbanization and with a greater reliance on natural resources. Democracy has a weak positive relation to country size. An increase in the middle class share of income predicts a rise in political rights. The apparently strong relation of democracy to colonial heritage mostly disappears when the economic variables are held constant. Similarly, the allowance for these economic variables weakens the interplay between democracy and religious affiliation. However, negative effects from Muslim and non-religious affiliations remain intact. The level of democracy tends to adjust over five years about one-quarter of the way toward the target value determined by the standard of living and the other explanatory variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Barro, Robert, 1997. "Determinants Of Democracy," Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID) Papers 294386, Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:hariid:294386
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.294386
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/294386/files/harvard031.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Alesina & Enrico Spolaore, 1997. "On the Number and Size of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1027-1056.
    2. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, December.
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