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Kathryn S. Wilson

Personal Details

First Name:Kathryn
Middle Name:S.
Last Name:Wilson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwi286
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.kent.edu/business/economics/~kwilson3/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
College of Business Administration
Kent State University

Kent, Ohio (United States)
http://www.kent.edu/business/economics

:
(330) 672-2366
P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001
RePEc:edi:dekenus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Blanden, Jo & Haveman, Robert & Smeeding, Timothy M. & Wilson, Kathryn, 2014. "Intergenerational mobility in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative study of parent-child pathways," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59332, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Kathryn Wilson & Kristina Lambright & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2004. "School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 62, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  3. R. Haveman & B. Wolfe & K. Wilson & E. Peterson, "undated". "Do Teens Make Rational Choices? The Case of Teen Nonmarital Childbearing," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1137-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  4. R. Haveman & K. Holden & B. Wolfe & P. Smith & K. Wilson, "undated". "The Changing Economic Status of Disabled Women, 1982–1991: Trends and Their Determinants," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1143-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  5. R. Haveman & K. Holden & B. Wolfe & P. Smith & K. Wilson, "undated". "The Changing Economic Status of U.S. Disabled Men: Trends and Their Determinants, 1982–1991," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1190-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

Articles

  1. Jo Blanden & Robert Haveman & Timothy Smeeding & Kathryn Wilson, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility in the United States and Great Britain: A Comparative Study of Parent–Child Pathways," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 425-449, September.
  2. Kathryn Wilson & Kristina Lambright & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2006. "School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and the Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 1(4), pages 396-424, September.
  3. Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman, 2005. "The Role of Expectations in Adolescent Schooling Choices: Do Youths Respond to Economic Incentives?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(3), pages 467-492, July.
  4. Robert Haveman & Karen Holden & Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe, 2003. "Social security, age of retirement, and economic well-being: Intertemporal and demographic patterns among retired-worker beneficiaries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 369-394, May.
  5. Wilson, Kathryn, 2002. "The effects of school quality on income," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 579-588, December.
  6. Wolfe, Barbara & Wilson, Kathryn & Haveman, Robert, 2001. "The role of economic incentives in teenage nonmarital childbearing choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 473-511, September.
  7. Kathryn Wilson, 2001. "The Determinants of Educational Attainment: Modeling and Estimating the Human Capital Model and Education Production Functions," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 518-551, January.
  8. Kathryn Wilson, 2000. "Using the Psid to Study the Effects of School Spending," Public Finance Review, , vol. 28(5), pages 428-451, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Blanden, Jo & Haveman, Robert & Smeeding, Timothy M. & Wilson, Kathryn, 2014. "Intergenerational mobility in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative study of parent-child pathways," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59332, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. Jeremiah Richey & Alicia Rosburg, 2017. "Changing Roles Of Ability And Education In U.S. Intergenerational Mobility," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 187-201, January.
    2. Landerso, Rasmus & Heckman, James J., 2016. "The Scandinavian Fantasy: The Sources of Intergenerational Mobility in Denmark and the U.S," IZA Discussion Papers 10000, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Timothy Smeeding, 2013. "GINI DP 89: On the relationship between income inequality and intergenerational mobility," GINI Discussion Papers 89, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    4. Juan C. Palomino & Gustavo A. Marrero & Juan G. Rodriguez, 2014. "One size doesn't fit all: A quantile analysis of intergenerational income mobility in the US (1980-2010)," Working Papers 349, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    5. Soobin Kim, 2017. "Intergenerational mobility in Korea," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-18, December.
    6. Sander Wagner, 2017. "Children of the Reunification: Gendered Effects on Intergenerational Mobility in Germany," Working Papers 2017-03, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    7. Kohei Kubota, 2017. "Intergenerational Wealth Elasticity in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 68(4), pages 470-496, December.
    8. Juan C. Palomino & Gustavo A. Marrero & Juan G. Rodriguez, 2016. "Channels of inequality of opportunity: The role of education and occupation in Europe," Working Papers 411, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. Bevis, Leah E.M. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2015. "Decomposing Intergenerational Income Elasticity: The Gender-differentiated Contribution of Capital Transmission in Rural Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 233-252.

  2. Kathryn Wilson & Kristina Lambright & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2004. "School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 62, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.

    Cited by:

    1. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2008. "Short-run distributional effects of public education transfers to tertiary education students in seven European countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 275-288.

  3. R. Haveman & B. Wolfe & K. Wilson & E. Peterson, "undated". "Do Teens Make Rational Choices? The Case of Teen Nonmarital Childbearing," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1137-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

    Cited by:

    1. Mariana Alfonso, 2008. "Las chicas sólo quieren divertirse? Sexualidad, embarazo y maternidad en las adolecentes de Bolivia," Research Department Publications 4539, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. Mariana Alfonso, 2008. "Girls Just Want to Have Fun? Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Motherhood among Bolivian Teenagers," Research Department Publications 4538, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    3. Mariana Alfonso, 2008. "Girls Just Want to Have Fun?: Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Motherhood among Bolivian Teenagers," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1614, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. José Canals-Cerdá & Shiferaw Gurmu, 2008. "Premarital Birth Among Young Hispanic Women: Evidence from Semiparametric Competing Risks Analysis," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(4), pages 421-440, December.

  4. R. Haveman & K. Holden & B. Wolfe & P. Smith & K. Wilson, "undated". "The Changing Economic Status of U.S. Disabled Men: Trends and Their Determinants, 1982–1991," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1190-99, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.

    Cited by:

    1. Quamrul Ashraf & Oded Galor, 2013. "The 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(1), pages 1-46, February.
    2. Friedrich, T., 2009. "Wise exploitation – a game with a higher productivity than cooperation – transforms biological productivity into economic productivity," MPRA Paper 22862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Quamrul Ashraf & Oded Galor, 2010. "The "Out of Africa" Hypothesis, Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Development," Working Papers 2010-7, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    4. Robert Haveman & Karen Holden & Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe, 2003. "Social security, age of retirement, and economic well-being: Intertemporal and demographic patterns among retired-worker beneficiaries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 369-394, May.

Articles

  1. Jo Blanden & Robert Haveman & Timothy Smeeding & Kathryn Wilson, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility in the United States and Great Britain: A Comparative Study of Parent–Child Pathways," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 425-449, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Kathryn Wilson & Kristina Lambright & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2006. "School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and the Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 1(4), pages 396-424, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig & Whitney Ruble & Timothy Smeeding, 2013. "Comparing the incidence of taxes and social spending in Brazil and the United States," Working Papers 316, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig & Whitney Ruble & Timothy Smeeding, 2013. "Comparing the Incidence of Taxes and Social Spending in Brazil and the United States," Working Papers 1317, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    3. Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig & Whitney Ruble & Timothy Smeeding, 2013. "Comparing the incidence of taxes and social spending in Brazil and the United States," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 16, Tulane University, Department of Economics.

  3. Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman, 2005. "The Role of Expectations in Adolescent Schooling Choices: Do Youths Respond to Economic Incentives?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(3), pages 467-492, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Lindvall, Lars, 2009. "Neighbourhoods, economic incentives and post compulsory education choices," Working Paper Series 2009:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Lauer, Charlotte, 2000. "Enrolments in higher education in West Germany: the impact of social background, labour market returns and educational funding," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-59, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Flannery, Darragh & O’Donoghue, Cathal, 2013. "The demand for higher education: A static structural approach accounting for individual heterogeneity and nesting patterns," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 243-257.
    4. Mahuteau, Stephane & Mavromaras, Kostas G., 2013. "An Analysis of the Impact of Socioeconomic Disadvantage and School Quality on the Probability of School Dropout," IZA Discussion Papers 7566, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Wolter, Stefan C. & Zbinden, André, 2001. "Rates of Return to Education: The View of Students in Switzerland," IZA Discussion Papers 371, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Cullinan, John & Flannery, Darragh & Walsh, Sharon & McCoy, Selina, 2012. "Distance Effects, Social Class and the Decision to Participate in Higher Education in Ireland," Papers WP444, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. Stocké, Volker, 2008. "Educational decisions as rational choice? : an empirical test of the Erikson-Jonsson model for explaining educational attainment," Papers 08-03, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    8. Asplund, Rita (ed.), . "Education and Earnings. Further Evidence from Europe," ETLA B, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 183, May.
    9. Flannery, Darragh & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2009. "Participation in Higher Education: A Random Parameter Logit Approach with Policy Simulations," IZA Discussion Papers 4163, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, 2006. "Education, Risk Preference and Wages," Working Papers 2006002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2006.

  4. Robert Haveman & Karen Holden & Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe, 2003. "Social security, age of retirement, and economic well-being: Intertemporal and demographic patterns among retired-worker beneficiaries," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 369-394, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Del Bono, Emilia & Sala, Emanuela & Hancock, Ruth & Gunnell, Caroline & Parisi, Lavinia, 2007. "Gender, older people and social exclusion: a gendered review and secondary analysis of the data," ISER Working Paper Series 2007-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Bender, Keith A., 2012. "An analysis of well-being in retirement: The role of pensions, health, and ‘voluntariness’ of retirement," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 424-433.
    3. Leslie McGranahan & Anna L. Paulson, 2011. "How do benefit adjustments for government transfer programs compare with their participants' inflation experiences?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 113-136.
    4. Bagis, Bilal, 2017. "Macroeconomic Implications of Changes in Social Security Rules," MPRA Paper 84051, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  5. Wilson, Kathryn, 2002. "The effects of school quality on income," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 579-588, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Rossana Patron, 2014. "On the institutional limits to human capital," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 45, pages 867-878 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    2. Ashraf El-Araby Aly & James Ragan, 2010. "Arab immigrants in the United States: how and why do returns to education vary by country of origin?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 519-538, March.
    3. Torbjørn Hægeland & Oddbjørn Raaum & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2004. "Pupil achievement, school resources and family backgr," Discussion Papers 397, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    4. McHenry, Peter, 2011. "The effect of school inputs on labor market returns that account for selective migration," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 39-54, February.

  6. Wolfe, Barbara & Wilson, Kathryn & Haveman, Robert, 2001. "The role of economic incentives in teenage nonmarital childbearing choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 473-511, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Arnaud Chevalier & Tarja K. Viitanen & Tarja K. Viitanen, 2003. "The long-run labour market consequences of teenage motherhood in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 323-343, May.
    2. Laura E. Hill & Christopher Jepsen, 2007. "Positive outcomes from poor starts: Predictors of dropping back in," Open Access publications 10197/4446, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman & Karen Pence & Jonathan Schwabish, 2007. "Do youth nonmarital childbearing choices reflect income and relationship expectations?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 73-100, February.
    4. Christopher A. Jepsen & Lisa K. Jepsen, 2006. "The Effects Of Statutory Rape Laws On Nonmarital Teenage Childbearing," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(1), pages 35-51, January.
    5. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Riphahn, Regina T., 2014. "Teenage Pregnancies and Births in Germany: Patterns and Developments," IZA Discussion Papers 8229, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Marcén, Miriam & Bellido, Héctor, 2013. "Teen Mothers and Culture," MPRA Paper 44712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Jason M. Fletcher & Barbara L. Wolfe, 2008. "Education and Labor Market Consequences of Teenage Childbearing: Evidence Using the Timing of Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Fixed Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 573, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    8. Arnstein Aassve & Simon Burgess & Carol Propper & Matt Dickson, 2006. "Employment, family union and childbearing decisions in Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 781-804.
    9. Kruger, Diana & Berthelon, Matias, 2009. "Delaying the Bell: The Effects of Longer School Days on Adolescent Motherhood in Chile," IZA Discussion Papers 4553, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Darwin Cortés & Juan Gallego & Darío Maldonado, 2011. "On the design of education conditional cash transfer programs and non education outcomes: the case of teenage pregnancy," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 008828, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.
    11. Bradbury, Bruce, 2006. "The impact of young motherhood on education, employment and marriage," MPRA Paper 1419, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ekert-Jaffe, Olivia & Grossbard, Shoshana, 2008. "Does community property discourage unpartnered births?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 25-40, March.
    13. Veronica Jacobsen & Nicholas Mays & Ron Crawford & Barbara Annesley & Paul Christoffel & Grant Johnston & Sid Durbin, 2002. "Investing in Well-being: An Analytical Framework," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/23, New Zealand Treasury.
    14. Blanca Zuluaga, 2018. "Early childbearing and the option to postpone," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID, vol. 37(73), February.
    15. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "The effects of teenage childbearing on the short- and long-term health behaviors of mothers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 201-218, January.
    16. Plotnick, Robert D., 2004. "Teenage expectations and desires about family formation in the United States," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6274, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    17. Rafael Novella & Laura Ripani, 2016. "Are you (not) expecting? The unforeseen benefits of job training on teenage pregnancy," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    18. Robert D. Plotnick, 2004. "Teenage Expectations and Desires about Family Formation in the United States," CASE Papers 090, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    19. Cortés Darwin & Gallego Juan & Maldonado Darío, 2016. "On the Design of Educational Conditional Cash Transfer Programs and Their Impact on Non-Education Outcomes: The Case of Teenage Pregnancy," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 219-258, January.
    20. Barbara L. Wolfe & Robert H. Haveman, 2002. "Social and nonmarket benefits from education in an advanced economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 47(Jun), pages 97-142.

  7. Kathryn Wilson, 2001. "The Determinants of Educational Attainment: Modeling and Estimating the Human Capital Model and Education Production Functions," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 518-551, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Lindvall, Lars, 2009. "Neighbourhoods, economic incentives and post compulsory education choices," Working Paper Series 2009:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Gönsch, Iris, 2010. "Determinants of primary school enrollment in Haiti and the Dominican Republic," Discussion Papers 54, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).
    3. Fatma El-Hamidi, 2006. "General or Vocational Schooling? Evidence on School Choice, Returns, and 'Sheepskin' Effects from Egypt 1998," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 157-176.
    4. Alberto Posso, 2017. "Preferential trade agreements with labour provisions and child labour: evidence from Asia and the Pacific," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 24(2), pages 89-112, December.
    5. Lamichhane, Kamal & Kawakatsu, Yoshito, 2015. "Disability and determinants of schooling: A case from Bangladesh," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 98-105.
    6. El-Osta, Hisham S., 2011. "The Impact of Human Capital on Farm Operator Household Income," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 40(1), April.
    7. Fatma El-Hamidi, 2004. "General or Vocational? Evidence on School Choice, Returns, and “Sheep Skin” Effects from Egypt 1998," Working Papers 0406, Economic Research Forum, revised 01 Aug 2004.
    8. Siahaan, Freddy & Lee, Daniel Y. & Kalist, David E., 2014. "Educational attainment of children of immigrants: Evidence from the national longitudinal survey of youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-8.
    9. Stocké, Volker, 2008. "Educational decisions as rational choice? : an empirical test of the Erikson-Jonsson model for explaining educational attainment," Papers 08-03, Sonderforschungsbreich 504.
    10. Mona Said & Fatma El-Hamidi, 2008. "Taking Technical Education Seriously in MENA: Determinants, Labor Market Implications and Policy Lessons," Working Papers 450, Economic Research Forum, revised 09 Jan 2008.
    11. Joseph Sabia & Daniel Rees, 2009. "The effect of sexual abstinence on females' educational attainment," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(4), pages 695-715, November.

  8. Kathryn Wilson, 2000. "Using the Psid to Study the Effects of School Spending," Public Finance Review, , vol. 28(5), pages 428-451, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Lee Rainwater & Timothy Smeeding & Irwin Garfinkel, 2004. "Welfare State Expenditures and the Distribution of Child Opportunities," LIS Working papers 379, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    2. Wilson, Kathryn, 2002. "The effects of school quality on income," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 579-588, December.
    3. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2008. "Short-run distributional effects of public education transfers to tertiary education students in seven European countries," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 275-288.
    4. Hans J. Baumgartner, 2004. "Are There Any Class Size Effects on Early Career Earnings in West Germany?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 417, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Fiona Steele & Anna Vignoles & Andrew Jenkins, 2007. "The effect of school resources on pupil attainment: a multilevel simultaneous equation modelling approach," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(3), pages 801-824.
    6. Kathryn Wilson & Kristina Lambright & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2004. "School Finance, Equivalent Educational Expenditure, and Income Distribution: Equal Dollars or Equal Chances for Success?," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 62, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    7. Timothy Smeeding & Irwin Garfinkel & Lee Rainwater, 2005. "Welfare State Expenditures and the Redistribution of Well-Being: Children, Elders, and Others in Comparative Perspective," LIS Working papers 387, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    8. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2007. "Distributional Effects of Public Education Transfers in Seven European Countries," Papers WP207, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Irwin Garfinkel & Lee Rainwater & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2006. "A re-examination of welfare states and inequality in rich nations: How in-kind transfers and indirect taxes change the story," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 897-919.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2005-03-13
  2. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2015-04-11
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2005-03-13

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