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An Analysis of the Impact of Socioeconomic Disadvantage and School Quality on the Probability of School Dropout

Author

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  • Mahuteau, Stephane

    () (University of Adelaide)

  • Mavromaras, Kostas G.

    () (NILS, Flinders University)

Abstract

PISA scores are an internationally established indicator of student and school performance. This paper builds on the evidence that better PISA scores are known to be associated with better later life outcomes. It uses the Australian PISA micro-level data in combination with its longitudinal continuation in the LSAY data, to measure the degree to which individual PISA scores are associated with individual early school dropouts. It distinguishes between student and school factors and estimates a model of the propensity to drop out from school between ages 15 and 18. The paper finds that PISA scores are a good predictor of early dropout, and that individual and social disadvantage plays a crucial role in this relationship both directly and indirectly.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahuteau, Stephane & Mavromaras, Kostas G., 2013. "An Analysis of the Impact of Socioeconomic Disadvantage and School Quality on the Probability of School Dropout," IZA Discussion Papers 7566, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7566
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
    2. Oreopoulos, Philip, 2007. "Do dropouts drop out too soon? Wealth, health and happiness from compulsory schooling," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2213-2229, December.
    3. Kathryn Wilson & Barbara Wolfe & Robert Haveman, 2005. "The Role of Expectations in Adolescent Schooling Choices: Do Youths Respond to Economic Incentives?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(3), pages 467-492, July.
    4. Dewey, James & Husted, Thomas A. & Kenny, Lawrence W., 1999. "The ineffectiveness of school inputs: a product of misspecification?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 27-45, February.
    5. Rumberger, Russell W. & Lamb, Stephen P., 2003. "The early employment and further education experiences of high school dropouts: a comparative study of the United States and Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 353-366, August.
    6. Zvi Eckstein & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1999. "Why Youths Drop Out of High School: The Impact of Preferences, Opportunities, and Abilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(6), pages 1295-1340, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan Guio & Álvaro Choi & Josep-Oriol Escardíbul, 2016. "Labor markets, academic performance and the risk of school dropout: evidence for Spain," Working Papers 2016/9, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    2. Alexandra Flayols, 2017. "Les motifs d'arrêt de la scolarité dans la région de Marrakech," Working Papers hal-01483462, HAL.
    3. Jerrim, John & Lopez-Agudo, Luis Alejandro & Marcenaro-Gutierrez, Oscar D. & Shure, Dominique, 2017. "What Happens When Econometrics and Psychometrics Collide? An Example Using the PISA Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10847, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    PISA; socioeconomic disadvantage; school dropout; multilevel modelling; student outcomes;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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