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Midori Wakabayashi

Personal Details

First Name:Midori
Middle Name:
Last Name:Wakabayashi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pwa305
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Graduate School of Economics and Management
Tohoku University

Sendai, Japan
http://www.econ.tohoku.ac.jp/

:

Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8476
RePEc:edi:fetohjp (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. YIN Ting & KUREISHI Wataru & WAKABAYASHI Midori, 2015. "Using Subjective Income Expectations to test the Permanent Income Hypothesis: Evidence from Chinese micro-data (Japanese)," Discussion Papers (Japanese) 15016, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  2. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Y. Horioka, 2006. "Is the Eldest Son Different? The Residential Choice of Siblings in Japan," NBER Working Papers 12655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," NBER Working Papers 11560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Wataru Kureishi & Midori Wakabayashi, 2013. "What motivates single women to save? the case of Japan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 681-704, December.
  2. Wataru Kureishi & Midori Wakabayashi, 2011. "Son preference in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 873-893, July.
  3. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2010. "Why do first-born children live together with parents?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 159-172, August.
  4. Wakabayashi, Midori & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2009. "Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 337-348, December.
  5. Midori Wakabayashi, 2008. "The retirement consumption puzzle in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 983-1005, October.
  6. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2008. "Taxing the Stork," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 61(2), pages 167-187, June.
  7. Midori Wakabayashi, 2005. "Annuitized Asset Adequacy In Japan: The Demand For Individual Pensions," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 51(3), pages 419-442, September.
  8. Wakabayashi, Midori, 2001. "Retirement Saving in Japan: With Emphasis on the Impact of Social Security and Retirement Payments," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 131-159, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Y. Horioka, 2006. "Is the Eldest Son Different? The Residential Choice of Siblings in Japan," NBER Working Papers 12655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
    2. James Raymo & Yanfei Zhou, 2012. "Living Arrangements and the Well-Being of Single Mothers in Japan," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(5), pages 727-749, October.
    3. Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2016. "Are the Japanese Unique? Evidence from Household Saving and Bequest Behavior," AGI Working Paper Series 2016-12, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    4. Horioka, Charles Yuji & Gahramanov, Emin & Hayat, Aziz & Tang, Xueli, 2016. "Why Do Children Take Care of Their Elderly Parents? Are the Japanese Any Different?," AGI Working Paper Series 2016-11, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    5. Pestieau, Pierre & Ponthiere, Gregory, 2016. "Long-term care and births timing," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 340-357.
    6. Komura, Mizuki & Ogawa, Hikaru, 2016. "The Prodigal Son: Does the Younger Brother Always Care for His Parents in Old Age?," IZA Discussion Papers 9732, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Wei-hsin Yu & Kuo-hsien Su & Chi-Tsun Chiu, 2012. "Sibship Characteristics and Transition to First Marriage in Taiwan: Explaining Gender Asymmetries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(4), pages 609-636, August.
    8. HORI Masahiro & MITSUYAMA Nahoko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi, 2015. "New Evidence on Intra-Household Allocation of Resources in Japanese Households," ESRI Discussion paper series 321, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2009. "Do Bequests Increase or Decrease Wealth Inequalities?," ISER Discussion Paper 0729, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    10. Francisca Antman, 2007. "Who Cares for the Elderly? Intrafamily Resource Allocation and Migration in Mexico," Discussion Papers 06-031, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    11. Tien Manh Vu & Hisakazu Matsushige, 2016. "Gender, Sibling Order, and Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Education: Evidence from Japanese Twins," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 147-170, June.
    12. Ziegler Andreas, 2010. "Z-Tests in Multinomial Probit Models under Simulated Maximum Likelihood Estimation: Some Small Sample Properties," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 230(5), pages 630-652, October.
    13. Ting Yin, 2009. "Parent-Child Co-residence and Bequest Motives in China," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 09-26, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    14. Francisca M. Antman, 2012. "Elderly Care and Intrafamily Resource Allocation when Children Migrate," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(2), pages 331-363.
    15. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2010. "Why do first-born children live together with parents?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 159-172, August.

  2. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," NBER Working Papers 11560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Maria Pereira & Filipe Coelho, 2013. "Untangling the Relationship Between Income and Subjective Well-Being: The Role of Perceived Income Adequacy and Borrowing Constraints," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 985-1005, June.
    2. Kaiji Chen & Ayşe İmrohoroğlu & Selahattin İmrohoroğlu, 2007. "The Japanese saving rate between 1960 and 2000: productivity, policy changes, and demographics," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(1), pages 87-104, July.
    3. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0640, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Ryan R. Brady, 2007. "Consumer Credit, Liquidity and the Transmission Mechanism of Monetary Policy," Departmental Working Papers 20, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    5. Miki Kohara & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2006. "Do Borrowing Constraints Matter? An Analysis of Why the Permanent Income Hypothesis Does Not Apply in Japan," NBER Working Papers 12330, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Marion Leturcq, 2011. "Do bankers prefer married couples?," Working Papers halshs-00655584, HAL.
    7. Ryan R. Brady, 2006. "Credit Cards and Monetary Policy: Are Households still liquidity-constrained?," Departmental Working Papers 12, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    8. Brady, Ryan R., 2008. "Structural breaks and consumer credit: Is consumption smoothing finally a reality?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1246-1268, September.

Articles

  1. Wataru Kureishi & Midori Wakabayashi, 2013. "What motivates single women to save? the case of Japan," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 681-704, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Grossbard, Shoshana & Mukhopadhyay, Sankar, 2017. "Body-Weight and Women's Hours of Work: More Evidence That Marriage Markets Matter," IZA Discussion Papers 10775, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Shoshana Grossbard & Sankar Mukhopadhyay, 2017. "Marriage markets as explanation for why heavier people work more hours," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-30, December.
    3. Lugilde, Alba & Bande, Roberto & Riveiro, Dolores, 2017. "Precautionary Saving: a review of the theory and the evidence," MPRA Paper 77511, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Wataru Kureishi & Midori Wakabayashi, 2011. "Son preference in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 873-893, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Moriguchi, Chiaki, 2010. "Child Adoption in Japan, 1948-2008―A Comparative Historical Analysis―," Economic Review, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 61(4), pages 342-357, January.
    2. Griffen, Andrew S. & Nakamuro, Makiko & Inui, Tomohiko, 2015. "Fertility and maternal labor supply in Japan: Conflicting policy goals?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 52-72.
    3. Tien Manh Vu, 2012. "The lexicographic preference for a son: evidence from household data in Vietnam," OSIPP Discussion Paper 12E001, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    4. HORI Masahiro & MITSUYAMA Nahoko & SHIMIZUTANI Satoshi, 2015. "New Evidence on Intra-Household Allocation of Resources in Japanese Households," ESRI Discussion paper series 321, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    5. Tien Manh Vu & Hisakazu Matsushige, 2016. "Gender, Sibling Order, and Differences in the Quantity and Quality of Education: Evidence from Japanese Twins," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 147-170, June.
    6. Tien Manh Vu & Hisakazu Matsushige, 2013. "Gender, sibling order, and differences in the quantity and quality of educational attainment: Evidence using Japanese twin data," OSIPP Discussion Paper 13E007, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    7. Yukawa Shiho, 2015. "Effects of Fatherhood on Male Wage and Labor Supply in Japan," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 437-474, April.
    8. Kohei Kubota, 2017. "Intergenerational Wealth Elasticity in Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 68(4), pages 470-496, December.
    9. Tien Vu, 2014. "One male offspring preference: evidence from Vietnam using a split-population model," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 689-715, December.

  3. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2010. "Why do first-born children live together with parents?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 159-172, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Marie-Louise Leroux & Grégory Ponthiere, 2016. "Nursing Home Choice, Family Bargaining and Optimal Policy in a Hotelling Economy," Cahiers de recherche 1604, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    2. Steven Stern, 2014. "O Brother, Where Art Thou? We Need Your Help," Department of Economics Working Papers 14-08, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
    3. Pestieau, Pierre & Ponthiere, Gregory, 2016. "The public economics of long term care," CEPR Discussion Papers 11365, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Helmut Cremer & Pierre Pestieau, 2009. "Securing long-term care in the EU: some key issues," CREPP Working Papers 0905, Centre de Recherche en Economie Publique et de la Population (CREPP) (Research Center on Public and Population Economics) HEC-Management School, University of Liège.
    5. Canta Chiara & Pestieau Pierre, 2013. "Long-Term Care Insurance and Family Norms," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(2), pages 401-428, April.
    6. Komura, Mizuki & Ogawa, Hikaru, 2016. "The Prodigal Son: Does the Younger Brother Always Care for His Parents in Old Age?," IZA Discussion Papers 9732, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Stéphane Mechoulan & François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Intra-household allocation of family resources and birth order: evidence from France using siblings data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 937-964, October.

  4. Wakabayashi, Midori & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2009. "Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 337-348, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Midori Wakabayashi, 2008. "The retirement consumption puzzle in Japan," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 983-1005, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Deng, Tinghe & Chen, Qihui & Bai, Junfei, 2016. "Understanding the Retirement-Consumption Puzzle through the Lens of Food Consumption − Fuzzy Regression-Discontinuity Evidence from Urban China," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235540, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Antoine Bozio & Guy Laroque & Cormac O'Dea, 2013. "Discount Rate Heterogeneity Among Older Households: A Puzzle?," IFS Working Papers W13/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. Yingying Dong & Dennis Tao Yang, 2017. "Mandatory Retirement And The Consumption Puzzle: Disentangling Price And Quantity Declines," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1738-1758, October.
    4. Jonathan D. Fisher & Joseph Marchand, 2011. "Does the Retirement Consumption Puzzle Differ Across the Distribution?," Working Papers 11-09r, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Stephens, Melvin & Unayama, Takashi, 2012. "The impact of retirement on household consumption in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 62-83.
    6. Velarde, Melanie & Herrmann, Roland, 2014. "Time use for consumption and household production of food: is there a retirement-consumption puzzle in Germany?," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182829, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Li, Hongbin & Shi, Xinzheng & Wu, Binzhen, 2016. "The retirement consumption puzzle revisited: Evidence from the mandatory retirement policy in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 623-637.
    8. Velarde, Melanie & Herrmann, Roland, 2014. "How retirement changes consumption and household production of food: Lessons from German time-use data," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 3(C), pages 1-10.
    9. Toshiyuki Uemura & Yoshimi Adachi & Tomoki Kitamura, 2017. "Effects of Individual Resident Tax on the Consumption of Near-Retired Households in Japan," Discussion Paper Series 161, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised May 2017.
    10. Yingying Dong & Dennis Yang, 2016. "Mandatory Retirement and the Consumption Puzzle: Prices Decline or Quantities Decline?," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 16-251, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    11. Naohito Abe & Kyosuke Shiotani, 2014. "Who Faces Higher Prices? An Empirical Analysis Based on Japanese Homescan Data," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 9(1), pages 94-115, January.
    12. Daniel Burkhard, 2015. "Consumption smoothing at retirement: average and quantile treatment effects in the regression discontinuity design," Diskussionsschriften dp1512, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.

  6. Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2008. "Taxing the Stork," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 61(2), pages 167-187, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Dickert-Conlin, Stacy & Elder, Todd, 2010. "Suburban legend: School cutoff dates and the timing of births," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 826-841, October.
    2. Janice Compton & Lindsay M. Tedds, 2016. "Effects of the 2001 Extension of Paid Parental Leave Provisions on Birth Seasonality in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 42(1), pages 65-82, March.
    3. Sara LaLumia & James M. Sallee & Nicholas Turner, 2013. "New Evidence on Taxes and the Timing of Birth," NBER Working Papers 19283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2011. "Actual age at school entry, educational outcomes, and earnings," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 64-80, June.

  7. Wakabayashi, Midori, 2001. "Retirement Saving in Japan: With Emphasis on the Impact of Social Security and Retirement Payments," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 131-159, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2001. "Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic, or Dynastic?," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-134, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2005-09-11
  2. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2005-09-11
  3. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2006-11-18
  4. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (1) 2015-05-02
  5. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2006-11-18

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