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Parent-child co-residence and bequest motives in China

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  • Yin, Ting

Abstract

In this paper, I discuss the actual conditions and the determinants of co-residence between older parents and their children in China, especially the impact of bequest motives on parent-child co-residence, using micro data from the "Survey of Living Preferences and Satisfaction," conducted at Osaka University. More specifically, I use three subsamples of older respondents (those who live in urban areas, those who live in rural areas, and the pooled sample of both) to analyze the impact of bequest motives and other factors on the probability of parent-child co-residence. The results are as follows: bequest motives are strong in China, with more than 60% of respondents having a bequest motive, and the parent-child co-residence rate is also high (about 60%). Turning to the determinants of parent-child co-residence, children of urban parents are more likely to live with their older parents if their parents have a bequest motive, own their own homes, and live in an area where housing prices are high, a result which is consistent with both the selfish life-cycle and altruism models. Children are more likely to live with their older parents if their parents have a bequest motive in both the rural and combined samples, which implies that children are selfishly motivated and that the selfish life-cycle model applies in China.

Suggested Citation

  • Yin, Ting, 2010. "Parent-child co-residence and bequest motives in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 521-531, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:21:y:2010:i:4:p:521-531
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ting Yin, 2011. "The gWill h to Save in China," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 11-24, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
    2. Fengming Chen & Hiroshi Yoshida, 2016. "Number of Children and Living Arrangements of the Elderly in China," TERG Discussion Papers 352, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.
    3. Norifumi Yukutake & Shinichiro Iwata & Takako Idee, 2011. "Strategic Interaction between Inter Vivos Gifts and Housing Acquisition," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-201, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Iwata, Shinichiro & Yukutake, Norifumi, 2013. "Housing subsidy or parental support: Crowding-out effect of mortgage tax deduction," MPRA Paper 46647, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bequest motives Parent-child co-residence Life-cycle model or hypothesis Altruism model Strategic bequest motive or exchange motive;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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