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Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence


  • Meliyanni Johar
  • Shiko Maruyama
  • Sayaka Nakamura



Children play a key role in supporting elderly parents, and the literature has consistently found reciprocity whereby parents compensate their children for providing care and attention. To understand how the mode of compensation is related to the characteristics of parents and children, we studied the determinants of transitions to parent–child coresidence in Japan. The results conformed to the hypothesis that the mode of reciprocity depends on the costs and benefits of coresidence for each family member. Parental assets and care needs were associated with coresidence. Additionally, transitions to coresidence with married parents were characterized by young, unmarried children and the presence of parental housing assets, whereas transitions to coresidence with widowed mothers were characterized by mothers’ non-housing assets. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:36:y:2015:i:2:p:192-209 DOI: 10.1007/s10834-013-9387-7

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    Cited by:

    1. Maruyama, Shiko, 2015. "The effect of coresidence on parental health in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 1-22.
    2. Joan Costa-Font & Martin Karlsson & Henning Øien, 2015. "Informal Care and the Great Recession," CINCH Working Paper Series 1502, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Competent in Competition and Health, revised Feb 2015.
    3. Charles Yuji Horioka & Emin Gahramanov & Aziz Hayat & Xueli Tang, 2016. "Why Do Children Take Care of Their Elderly Parents? Are the Japanese Any Different?," ISER Discussion Paper 0970, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Mizuki Komura & Hikaru Ogawa, 2017. "The prodigal son: does the younger brother always care for his parentsin old age?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(22), pages 2153-2165, May.
    5. Dale R. DeBoer & Edward C. Hoang, 2017. "Inheritances and Bequest Planning: Evidence from the Survey of Consumer Finances," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 45-56, March.
    6. Stig S. Gezelius, 2017. "Considerate Exchange: Exploring Social Exchange on Family Farms," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 18-32, March.


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