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Intra-family Transfers in Japan: Intergenerational Co-residence, Distance, andContact

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  • Ken Yamada

Abstract

Classified broadly, two motives for intra-family transfers exist: altruism and selfishness. This paper examines two selfish hypotheses ―the exchange motive (strategic bequest motive) and the demonstration effect― using a new Japanese micro data set. My analysis of the determinants of intergenerational co-residence, distance between residences, and frequency of contact yields considerable support for the exchange motive but no support for the demonstration effect. The findings are consistent with the exchange motive after distinguishing it from mutual altruism using a specific question.

Suggested Citation

  • Ken Yamada, 2003. "Intra-family Transfers in Japan: Intergenerational Co-residence, Distance, andContact," ISER Discussion Paper 0575, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:dpr:wpaper:0575
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    File URL: http://www.iser.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/dp/2003/DP0575.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Wakabayashi, Midori & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2009. "Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 337-348, December.
    2. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
    3. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: filial support and dependence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(S1), pages 87-104, September.
    4. Charles Yuji Horioka & Emin Gahramanov & Aziz Hayat & Xueli Tang, 2016. "Why Do Children Take Care of Their Elderly Parents? Are the Japanese Any Different?," ISER Discussion Paper 0970, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    5. Lingguo Cheng & Hong Liu & Ye Zhang & Zhong Zhao, 2018. "The heterogeneous impact of pension income on elderly living arrangements: evidence from China’s new rural pension scheme," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 155-192.
    6. Shinichiro Iwata & Keiko Tamada, 2014. "The backward-bending commute times of married women with household responsibility," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 251-278, March.
    7. Charles Horioka, 2014. "Are Americans and Indians more altruistic than the Japanese and Chinese? Evidence from a new international survey of bequest plans," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 411-437, September.
    8. Ramon L. Clarete & Ernesto M. Pernia & Ammielou Gaduena & Adrian Mendoza, 2014. "The Role of Science, Technology and Research in Economic Development," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201407, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    9. Yin, Ting, 2010. "Parent-child co-residence and bequest motives in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 521-531, December.
    10. Norifumi Yukutake & Shinichiro Iwata & Takako Idee, 2011. "Strategic Interaction between Inter Vivos Gifts and Housing Acquisition," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-201, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    11. Iwata, Shinichiro & Yukutake, Norifumi, 2013. "Housing subsidy or parental support: Crowding-out effect of mortgage tax deduction," MPRA Paper 46647, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Mitrut, Andreea & Wolff, François-Charles, 2009. "A causal test of the demonstration effect theory," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 52-54, April.
    13. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2014. "Why Do People Leave Bequests? For Love or Self-Interest? Evidence from a New International Survey of Bequest Plans," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201406, University of the Philippines School of Economics.

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