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Does Coresidence Improve an Elderly Parent’s Health?

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  • Meliyanni Johar

    () (University of Technology, Sydney (UTS))

  • Shiko Maruyama

    () (School of Economics, The University of New South Wales)

Abstract

It is generally believed that intergenerational coresidence by elderly parents and adult children provides security for parents in their old age. In many countries, such intergenerational coresidence is the most common living arrangement. Using a nationally-representative dataset and a program evaluation technique that accounts for endogenous and heterogeneous treatment effects, we find robust evidence of a negative coresidence effect, contrary to the popular belief. The unintended adverse effect on parental health has significant implications for future informal care policies, given that coresidence is expected to remain the primary form of old age security in the foreseeable future.

Suggested Citation

  • Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Does Coresidence Improve an Elderly Parent’s Health?," Discussion Papers 2011-08, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  • Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2011-08
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    File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2011-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Li, Lydia W. & Zhang, Jiaan & Liang, Jersey, 2009. "Health among the oldest-old in China: Which living arrangements make a difference?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 220-227, January.
    2. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: filial support and dependence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(S1), pages 87-104, September.
    3. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 151-182, July.
    4. Kelly M. Everard & Helen W. Lach & Edwin B. Fisher & M. Carolyn Baum, 2000. "Relationship of Activity and Social Support to the Functional Health of Older Adults," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 55(4), pages 208-212.
    5. Aakvik, Arild & Heckman, James J. & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2005. "Estimating treatment effects for discrete outcomes when responses to treatment vary: an application to Norwegian vocational rehabilitation programs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 15-51.
    6. Basu, Anirban, 2011. "Economics of individualization in comparative effectiveness research and a basis for a patient-centered health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 549-559, May.
    7. A. Walter-Ginzburg & T. Blumstein & A. Chetrit & B. Modan, 2002. "Social Factors and Mortality in the Old-Old in Israel," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 57(5), pages 308-318.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maruyama, Shiko, 2015. "The effect of coresidence on parental health in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 1-22.
    2. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2015. "Reciprocity in the Formation of Intergenerational Coresidence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 192-209, June.
    3. Lingguo Cheng & Hong Liu & Ye Zhang & Zhong Zhao, 2018. "The heterogeneous impact of pension income on elderly living arrangements: evidence from China’s new rural pension scheme," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 155-192, January.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:200:y:2018:i:c:p:99-106 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    intergenerational coresidence; elderly; heath; treatment effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models

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