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Does Coresidence Improve An Elderly Parent'S Health?

Listed author(s):
  • Meliyanni Johar
  • Shiko Maruyama

SUMMARY It is generally believed that intergenerational coresidence by elderly parents and adult children provides old‐age security for parents. Although such coresidence is still the most common living arrangement in many countries, empirical evidence of its benefits to parental health is scarce. Using Indonesian data and a program evaluation technique that accounts for non‐random selection and heterogeneous treatment effect, we find robust evidence of a negative coresidence effect. We also find heterogeneity in the coresidence effect. Socially active elderly parents are less likely to be in coresidence, and when they do live with a child they experience a better coresidence effect. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Applied Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2014)
Issue (Month): 6 (September)
Pages: 965-983

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Handle: RePEc:wly:japmet:v:29:y:2014:i:6:p:965-983
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0883-7252/

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  1. Li, Lydia W. & Zhang, Jiaan & Liang, Jersey, 2009. "Health among the oldest-old in China: Which living arrangements make a difference?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 220-227, January.
  2. Kelly M. Everard & Helen W. Lach & Edwin B. Fisher & M. Carolyn Baum, 2000. "Relationship of Activity and Social Support to the Functional Health of Older Adults," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 55(4), pages 208-212.
  3. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2011. "Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: filial support and dependence," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(S1), pages 87-104, 09.
  4. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 151-182, July.
  5. A. Walter-Ginzburg & T. Blumstein & A. Chetrit & B. Modan, 2002. "Social Factors and Mortality in the Old-Old in Israel," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 57(5), pages 308-318.
  6. Basu, Anirban, 2011. "Economics of individualization in comparative effectiveness research and a basis for a patient-centered health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 549-559, May.
  7. Aakvik, Arild & Heckman, James J. & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2005. "Estimating treatment effects for discrete outcomes when responses to treatment vary: an application to Norwegian vocational rehabilitation programs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 15-51.
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