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Why do first-born children live together with parents?

Author

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  • Kureishi, Wataru
  • Wakabayashi, Midori

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the strategic residential location choices of multiple siblings who receive childcare assistance from their parents. Our three stage game yields a theoretical result that first-born children are more likely to live together with or close to their parents than second-born children, which is supported by our estimation results using Japanese micro-data. We also empirically show that the childcare assistance from parents is one of the determinants of the residential location choice of siblings. This paper is the first to succeed in explaining the residential location choice of siblings in Japan using economic incentives.

Suggested Citation

  • Kureishi, Wataru & Wakabayashi, Midori, 2010. "Why do first-born children live together with parents?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 159-172, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:japwor:v:22:y:2010:i:3:p:159-172
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kai A. Konrad & Harald Künemund & Kjell Erik Lommerud & Julio R. Robledo, 2002. "Geography of the Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 981-998, September.
    2. Wakabayashi, Midori & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2009. "Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 337-348, December.
    3. Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2009. "O Brother, Where Art Thou? The Effects of Having a Sibling on Geographic Mobility and Labour Market Outcomes," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(303), pages 528-556, July.
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    5. Charles Yuji Horioka, 2002. "Are the Japanese Selfish, Altruistic or Dynastic?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 53(1), pages 26-54.
    6. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 151-182, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stéphane Mechoulan & François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Intra-household allocation of family resources and birth order: evidence from France using siblings data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 937-964, October.
    2. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:22:p:2153-2165 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Steven Stern, 2014. "O Brother, Where Art Thou? We Need Your Help," Department of Economics Working Papers 14-08, Stony Brook University, Department of Economics.
    4. repec:ces:ifodic:v:7:y:2009:i:4:p:14567049 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Canta Chiara & Pestieau Pierre, 2013. "Long-Term Care Insurance and Family Norms," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(2), pages 401-428, April.
    6. Pestieau, Pierre & Ponthiere, Gregory, 2016. "The public economics of long term care," CEPR Discussion Papers 11365, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Mizuki Komura & Hikaru Ogawa, 2017. "The prodigal son: does the younger brother always care for his parentsin old age?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(22), pages 2153-2165, May.
    8. Helmuth Cremer & Pierre Pestieau, 2009. "Securing Long-term Care in the EU: Some Key Issues," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 7(4), pages 8-11, January.
    9. Helmuth Cremer & Pierre Pestieau, 2009. "Securing Long-term Care in the EU: Some Key Issues," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 7(4), pages 8-11, 01.
    10. Marie-Louise Leroux & Grégory Ponthiere, 2016. "Nursing Home Choice, Family Bargaining and Optimal Policy in a Hotelling Economy," Cahiers de recherche 1604, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.

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