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Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan

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  • Midori Wakabayashi
  • Charles Yuji Horioka

Abstract

In this paper, we use Japanese micro data to examine what characteristics borrowing-constrained households have and whether borrowing constraints have an important influence on household consumption behavior. We identify borrowing-constrained households using three different indicators, some of which are unique to our data source, and find that the characteristics of households that are likely to be borrowing-constrained differ depending on which of the three indicators we use. We also find that changes in current income have a positive and significant impact on changes in consumption in the case of households that are likely to be borrowing-constrained but not in the case of households that are unlikely to be borrowing-constrained. This result suggests that borrowing constraints have an important influence on household consumption behavior and that the presence of borrowing constraints is one explanation for why the life cycle-permanent income hypothesis does not hold in the real world.

Suggested Citation

  • Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," NBER Working Papers 11560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11560
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:fth:jonhop:390 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Carroll Christopher Dixon, 2001. "Death to the Log-Linearized Consumption Euler Equation! (And Very Poor Health to the Second-Order Approximation)," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-38, April.
    3. Nawata, Kazumitsu, 1995. "Estimation of sample-selection models by the maximum likelihood method," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 299-303.
    4. Tullio Jappelli & Jörn-Steffen Pischke & Nicholas S. Souleles, 1998. "Testing For Liquidity Constraints In Euler Equations With Complementary Data Sources," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 251-262, May.
    5. Sydney Ludvigson & Christina H. Paxson, 2001. "Approximation Bias In Linearized Euler Equations," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(2), pages 242-256, May.
    6. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 0640, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    7. Fumio Hayashi, 1982. "The Effect of Liquidity Constraints on Consumption: A Cross-Sectional Analysis," NBER Working Papers 0882, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Fumio Hayashi, 1985. "Tests for Liquidity Constraints: A Critical Survey," NBER Working Papers 1720, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. repec:fth:pennfi:69 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Tullio Jappelli, 1990. "Who is Credit Constrained in the U. S. Economy?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(1), pages 219-234.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Pereira & Filipe Coelho, 2013. "Untangling the Relationship Between Income and Subjective Well-Being: The Role of Perceived Income Adequacy and Borrowing Constraints," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 985-1005, June.
    2. Kaiji Chen & Ayşe İmrohoroğlu & Selahattin İmrohoroğlu, 2007. "The Japanese saving rate between 1960 and 2000: productivity, policy changes, and demographics," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(1), pages 87-104, July.
    3. Midori Wakabayashi & Charles Yuji Horioka, 2005. "Borrowing Constraints and Consumption Behavior in Japan," NBER Working Papers 11560, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ryan R. Brady, 2011. "Consumer Credit, Liquidity, And The Transmission Mechanism Of Monetary Policy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(1), pages 246-263, January.
    5. Kohara, Miki & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2006. "Do borrowing constraints matter? An analysis of why the permanent income hypothesis does not apply in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 358-377, December.
    6. Marion Leturcq, 2011. "Do bankers prefer married couples?," Working Papers halshs-00655584, HAL.
    7. Ryan R. Brady, 2006. "Credit Cards and Monetary Policy: Are Households still liquidity-constrained?," Departmental Working Papers 12, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    8. Brady, Ryan R., 2008. "Structural breaks and consumer credit: Is consumption smoothing finally a reality?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1246-1268, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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