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Subjective Intertemporal Substitution

Author

Listed:
  • Stefano Eusepi

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Giorgio Topa

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Andrea Tambalotti

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Richard Crump

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

Abstract

We estimate the elasticity of intertemporal substitution (EIS)—the elasticity of expected consumption growth with respect to variation in the real interest rate—using subjective expectations from the newly released FRBNY Survey of Consumer Expectations (SCE). This dataset is unique, since it includes consumers’ expectations of both consumption growth and inflation, with the latter providing subjective variation in ex ante real interest rates. As a result, we can estimate a subjective version of the consumption Euler equation, without having to take a stand on the process of expectation formation. Our main finding is that this subjective EIS is precisely and robustly estimated to be around 0.8 in the general population, consistent with typical macroeconomic calibrations of the Euler equation. However, we find some evidence that the EIS rises to slightly above one for high-income individuals, consistent with the assumptions in asset pricing models featuring long-run risks or rare disasters.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano Eusepi & Giorgio Topa & Andrea Tambalotti & Richard Crump, 2016. "Subjective Intertemporal Substitution," 2016 Meeting Papers 83, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:83
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco D’Acunto & Daniel Hoang & Michael Weber, 2020. "Managing Households' Expectations with Unconventional Policies," NBER Working Papers 27399, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Francesco D'Acunto & Daniel Hoang & Michael Weber & Michael Weber, 2016. "Unconventional Fiscal Policy, Inflation Expectations, and Consumption Expenditure," CESifo Working Paper Series 5793, CESifo.
    3. Richard K. Crump & Stefano Eusepi & Emanuel Moench, 2016. "The term structure of expectations and bond yields," Staff Reports 775, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Euiyoung Jung, 2021. "Rigid Wages, Endogenous Job Destruction, and Destabilizing Spirals," Working Papers halshs-03213006, HAL.
    5. Weber, Michael & Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Coibion, Olivier, 2022. "The Expected, Perceived, and Realized Inflation of U.S. Households before and during the COVID-19 Pandemic," IZA Discussion Papers 15027, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Francesco D’Acunto & Daniel Hoang & Michael Weber, 2017. "The Effect of Unconventional Fiscal Policy on Consumption Expenditure," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(01), pages 09-11, April.
    7. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tiziano Ropele, 2020. "Inflation Expectations and Firm Decisions: New Causal Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 135(1), pages 165-219.
    8. Coibion, Olivier & Georgarakos, Dimitris & Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Kenny, Geoff & Weber, Michael, 2021. "The Effect of Macroeconomic Uncertainty on Household Spending," CEPR Discussion Papers 15966, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. D'Acunto, Francesco & Hoang, Daniel & Paloviita, Maritta & Weber, Michael, 2019. "IQ, Expectations, and Choice," Research Discussion Papers 2/2019, Bank of Finland.
    10. Maarten van Rooij & Jakob de Haan, 2016. "Will helicopter money be spent? New evidence," DNB Working Papers 538, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    11. Francesco D'Acunto & Daniel Hoang & Michael Weber, 2018. "Unconventional Fiscal Policy," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 108, pages 519-523, May.
    12. Luis Armona & Andreas Fuster & Basit Zafar, 2019. "Home Price Expectations and Behaviour: Evidence from a Randomized Information Experiment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 86(4), pages 1371-1410.
    13. Baumann, Ursel & Darracq Pariès, Matthieu & Westermann, Thomas & Riggi, Marianna & Bobeica, Elena & Meyler, Aidan & Böninghausen, Benjamin & Fritzer, Friedrich & Trezzi, Riccardo & Jonckheere, Jana & , 2021. "Inflation expectations and their role in Eurosystem forecasting," Occasional Paper Series 264, European Central Bank.
    14. Francesco D’Acunto & Ulrike Malmendier & Michael Weber, 2022. "What Do the Data Tell Us About Inflation Expectations?," NBER Working Papers 29825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Luo, Yulei & Nie, Jun & Wang, Haijun, 2022. "Ignorance, pervasive uncertainty, and household finance," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 199(C).
    16. Luo, Yulei & Nie, Jun & Wang, Gaowang & Young, Eric R., 2017. "Rational inattention and the dynamics of consumption and wealth in general equilibrium," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 55-87.
    17. D'Acunto, Francesco & Hoang, Daniel & Paloviita, Maritta & Weber, Michael, 2019. "Human frictions in the transmission of economic policy," Working Paper Series in Economics 128, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Department of Economics and Management.
    18. Erwan Gautier & Eric Mengus, 2020. "What Matters in Households’ Inflation Expectations?Author-Name: Philippe Andrade," Working papers 770, Banque de France.
    19. Duca, Ioana A. & Kenny, Geoff & Reuter, Andreas, 2018. "Inflation expectations, consumption and the lower bound: micro evidence from a large euro area survey," Working Paper Series 2196, European Central Bank.
    20. Schlag, Christian & Thimme, Julian & Weber, Rüdiger, 2021. "Implied volatility duration: A measure for the timing of uncertainty resolution," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 127-144.
    21. Dimitris Christelis & Dimitris Georgarakos & Tullio Jappelli & Maarten van Rooij, 2020. "Consumption Uncertainty and Precautionary Saving," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(1), pages 148-161, March.
    22. Uros Djuric & Michael Neugart, 2021. "Helicopter money: survey evidence on expectation formation and consumption behaviour," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 273-294.

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    8. Tomáš Havránek, 2015. "Measuring Intertemporal Substitution: The Importance Of Method Choices And Selective Reporting," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 13(6), pages 1180-1204, December.
    9. Erwan Gautier & Eric Mengus, 2020. "What Matters in Households’ Inflation Expectations?Author-Name: Philippe Andrade," Working papers 770, Banque de France.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D15 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Intertemporal Household Choice; Life Cycle Models and Saving
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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