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How retirement changes consumption and household production of food: Lessons from German time-use data

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  • Velarde, Melanie
  • Herrmann, Roland

Abstract

In order to test whether a retirement-consumption puzzle does exist, we examine how food-related time use alters within the 50+ generation in Germany due to retirement. Based on the German Time-Use Survey, time-use patterns of retired and non-retired persons are compared statistically and determinants of time-use are elaborated by the use of double-hurdle and multiple regression models. With retirement, major changes take place in the food-related time use. Work-related food-away-from-home consumption is substituted by food production and consumption at home and associated shopping activities. Leisure-related away-from-home consumption gains importance for a portion of pensioners. These impacts are strong and highly significant for German households. By and large, there is no indication of a retirement-consumption puzzle but of a planned behavioral change in a new phase of life. Econometric analysis shows that other personal and sociodemographic variables explain food-related time use patterns in the 50+ generation, in particular gender, age, perceived health and the educational level attained.

Suggested Citation

  • Velarde, Melanie & Herrmann, Roland, 2014. "How retirement changes consumption and household production of food: Lessons from German time-use data," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 3(C), pages 1-10.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joecag:v:3:y:2014:i:c:p:1-10
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeoa.2013.12.003
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