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Sibship Characteristics and Transition to First Marriage in Taiwan: Explaining Gender Asymmetries

  • Wei-hsin Yu

    ()

  • Kuo-hsien Su

    ()

  • Chi-Tsun Chiu

    ()

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    No abstract is available for this item.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-012-9236-7
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Population Research and Policy Review.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 (August)
    Pages: 609-636

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:31:y:2012:i:4:p:609-636
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102983

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    1. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2011. "Older and Wiser? Birth Order and IQ of Young Men," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 103-120, March.
    2. Giuliano, Paola, 2006. "Living Arrangements in Western Europe: Does Cultural Origin Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 2042, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Arland Thornton & Ming-Cheng Chang & Te-Hsiung Sun, 1984. "Social and economic change, intergenerational relationships, and family formation in Taiwan," Demography, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 475-499, November.
    4. S Black & Paul Devereux & Kjell Salvanes, 2005. "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Size and Birth Order on Childrens Education," CEE Discussion Papers 0050, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    5. Wakabayashi, Midori & Horioka, Charles Yuji, 2009. "Is the eldest son different? The residential choice of siblings in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 337-348, December.
    6. William L. Parish & Robert J. Willis, 1993. "Daughters, Education, and Family Budgets Taiwan Experiences," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 863-898.
    7. Robert Michael & Nancy Tuma, 1985. "Entry into marriage and parenthood by young men and women: The influence of family background," Demography, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 515-544, November.
    8. Dalton Conley & Rebecca Glauber, 2006. "Parental Educational Investment and Children’s Academic Risk: Estimates of the Impact of Sibship Size and Birth Order from Exogenous Variation in Fertility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(4).
    9. Joseph Price, 2008. "Parent-Child Quality Time: Does Birth Order Matter?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(1).
    10. James Raymo, 2003. "Educational attainment and the transition to first marriage among Japanese women," Demography, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 83-103, February.
    11. Yu Xie & James Raymo & Kimberl Goyette & Arland Thornton, 2003. "Economic potential and entry into marriage and cohabitation," Demography, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 351-367, May.
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