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Population aging and the extended family in Taiwan

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew Mason

    (University of Hawai'i at Mānoa)

  • Sang-Hyop Lee

    (University of Hawai'i at Mānoa)

Abstract

Population aging produces changes in the availability of kin with uncertain implications for extended living arrangements. We propose a highly stylized model that can be used to analyze and project age-specific proportions of adults living in extended and nuclear households. The model is applied to Taiwan using annual data from 1978-1998. We estimate cohort and age effects showing that more recently born cohorts of seniors are less likely to live in extended households, but that as seniors age the proportion living in extended households increases. The effect of individual aging has diminished over time, however. The proportion of non-senior adults living in extended households has increased steadily because changes in the age structure have increased the availability of older kin. The model is used to project living arrangements and we conclude that the proportion living in extended households will begin to decline gradually for both seniors and non-seniors. The extended family is becoming less important in Taiwan, but it is not on the way out.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Mason & Sang-Hyop Lee, 2004. "Population aging and the extended family in Taiwan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(8), pages 197-230.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:10:y:2004:i:8
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2004.10.8
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol10/8/10-8.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lee, Ronald & Mason, Andrew & Miller, Timothy, 2000. "From Transfers to Individual Responsibility: Implications for Savings and Capital Accumulation in Taiwan and the United States," Arbetsrapport 2000:3, Institute for Futures Studies.
    2. Kotlikoff, Laurence J & Spivak, Avia, 1981. "The Family as an Incomplete Annuities Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(2), pages 372-391, April.
    3. Frances Kobrin, 1976. "The fall in household size and the rise of the primary individual in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 13(1), pages 127-138, February.
    4. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    5. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-349, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers & Yixiao Zhou, 2018. "Fertility and savings contractions in China: Long‐run global implications," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(11), pages 3194-3220, November.
    2. P. Albuquerque, 2009. "The Elderly and the Extended Household in Portugal: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(3), pages 271-289, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    family; household; living arrangements; Taiwan; population aging;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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