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Is the Persistent Gender Gap in Income and Wages Due to Unequal Family Responsibilities?

  • Angelov, Nikolay

    ()

    (IFAU)

  • Johansson, Per

    ()

    (Uppsala University)

  • Lindahl, Erica

    ()

    (IFAU)

We compare the income and wage trajectories of women in relation to their male partners before and after parenthood. Focusing on the within-couple gap allows us to control for both observed and unobserved attributes of the spouse and to estimate both short- and long-term effects of entering parenthood. Our main finding is that 15 years after the first child was born, the male-female gender gaps in income and wages have increased with 35 and 10 percentage points, respectively. In line with a collective labor supply model, the magnitude of these effects depends on relative incomes or wages within the family.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7181.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: forthcoming as 'Parenthood and the Gender Gap in Pay' in: Journal of Labor Economics, 2016, 34 (3)
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7181
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