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Home and Market Hours, Human Capital Accumulation and Fertility

Author

Listed:
  • Johanna Wallenius

    (Stockholm School of Economics)

  • Tobias Laun

    (Uppsala university)

Abstract

Sweden boasts high fertility and high female employment. Notably, also women with young children work. However, part-time employment is very prevalent. There is a notable gender gap in both wages and earnings, which widens substantially after women have children. In this paper we study the effect of family policies on female employment, fertility and the gender wage gap. We are particularly interested in understanding why part-time employment is so prevalent in Sweden, despite heavily subsidized daycare, and the effect of this on the widening of the gender wage gap. We are also interested in understanding the role of home production, particularly the unequal division of home work across genders, in shaping women’s career paths. To this end, we develop a structural, life cycle model of heterogenous households which features endogenous labor supply, endogenous human capital accumulation, endogenous fertility and home production.

Suggested Citation

  • Johanna Wallenius & Tobias Laun, 2016. "Home and Market Hours, Human Capital Accumulation and Fertility," 2016 Meeting Papers 518, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed016:518
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias & Costas Meghir & Jonathan Shaw, 2016. "Female Labor Supply, Human Capital, and Welfare Reform," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 84, pages 1705-1753, September.
    2. Angelov, Nikolay & Johansson, Per & Lindahl, Erica, 2013. "Is the persistent gender gap in income and wages due to unequal family responsibilities?," Working Paper Series 2013:3, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Erdal Tekin, 2007. "Childcare Subsidies, Wages, and Employment of Single Mothers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
    4. Christian Siegel, 2012. "Female Employment and Fertility - The Effects of Rising Female Wages," CEP Discussion Papers dp1156, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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