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Gender wage gap and the role of skills: evidence from PIAAC dataset

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  • Christl, Michael
  • Köppl-Turyna, Monika

Abstract

Our paper makes a first attempt to address the impact of skills and skill use in the analysis of the gender wage gap using the PIAAC dataset. Using the case of Austria, we show that skill use as well as the skill match play an important role with regard to wage regressions of men as well as women. When we take skills into account in the gender wage gap analysis, the unexplained part of the gender wage gap is reduced by almost 4 percentage points along the whole wage distribution. Our results suggest that skill use and match play a crucial role in explaining the gender wage gap. Additionally, we show, that the self-selection problem biases the results, in particular in the lower and middle parts of the wage distribution and that we should control for it, although the effect is small. When we additionally consider discretionary bonus payments, we find that the unexplained part in the gender wage gap increases, especially in the upper part of the wage distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Christl, Michael & Köppl-Turyna, Monika, 2017. "Gender wage gap and the role of skills: evidence from PIAAC dataset," GLO Discussion Paper Series 63, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:63
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    1. repec:wfo:monber:y:2017:i:9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:wfo:monber:y:2017:i:9:p:713-725 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gap; skills; Austria;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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