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Income and the integration of migrants in the Russian labour market

Author

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  • Smirnykh, L.

    (National Research University "Higher School of Economics", Moscow, Russia)

  • Polaykova, E.

    (National Research University "Higher School of Economics", Saint-Petersburg, Russia)

Abstract

Labour resources of countries are important for their economic growth and national security. The problem of the native population decline in many countries is solved by increasing an influx of international immigrants. Russia is not an exception. The main research object of this study is the special category of immigrants - foreign-born population. The character of integration of foreign-born population on the Russian labour market is the main research subject in this study. For our analysis we use the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey data of 2006-2012 and apply Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions. Our findings show that integration of the foreign-born in the Russian labour market depends on their ethnicity and income level. The ethnic Russian foreign-born have similar income compared to the natives. However, income of the non-Russian ethnic foreign-born is lower than income of the natives. At the same time, the income differences between two groups decrease with their income level growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Smirnykh, L. & Polaykova, E., 2020. "Income and the integration of migrants in the Russian labour market," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 47(3), pages 84-104.
  • Handle: RePEc:nea:journl:y:2020:i:47:p:84-104
    DOI: 10.31737/2221-2264-2020-47-3-4
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigration; foreign-born; integration; income differentiation; discrimination; labour market;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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