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The earning differential between natives and individuals with immigrant background in Russia: The role of ethnicity

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  • Polyakova, Evgeniya

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

  • Smirnykh, Larisa

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the role of ethnicity in the earning differential between individuals with immigrant background and native workers in Russia using nationally representative data of Russian longitudinal monitoring survey from 2004–2012. The results show that not ethnically Russian individuals with immigrant background in average earn less than native workers and ethnically Russian individuals with immigration background.

Suggested Citation

  • Polyakova, Evgeniya & Smirnykh, Larisa, 2016. "The earning differential between natives and individuals with immigrant background in Russia: The role of ethnicity," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 43, pages 52-72.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0297
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    Cited by:

    1. Polyakova, Evgeniya (Полякова, Евгения), 2019. "The Earnings Differential Between Long-Тerm Immigrants and Natives in Russia: Тhe Role of Cohorts [Трудовые Доходы Долгосрочных Иммигрантов В России: Влияние Периода Переезда]," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 5, pages 62-79, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    immigrant background; sectoral segregation; earning differential; labor demand; Russia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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