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Kyle Mangum

Personal Details

First Name:Kyle
Middle Name:
Last Name:Mangum
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1996
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/kmangum104/home
Terminal Degree:2012 (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Andrew Young School of Policy Studies
Georgia State University

Atlanta, Georgia (United States)
http://aysps.gsu.edu/econ

: (404) 651-3990
(404) 651-3996
(404) 651-3990
RePEc:edi:degsuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Patrick Coate & Kyle Mangum, 2019. "Fast Locations and Slowing Labor Mobility," Working Papers 19-49, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  2. H. Spencer Banzhaf & Kyle Mangum, 2019. "Capitalization as a Two-Part Tariff: The Role of Zoning," Working Papers 19-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  3. Patrick Bayer & Kyle Mangum & James W. Roberts, 2016. "Speculative Fever: Investor Contagion in the Housing Bubble," NBER Working Papers 22065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Patrick Bayer & Christopher Geissler & Kyle Mangum & James W. Roberts, 2011. "Speculators and Middlemen: The Strategy and Performance of Investors in the Housing Market," NBER Working Papers 16784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Patrick Coate & Kyle Mangum, 2019. "Fast Locations and Slowing Labor Mobility," Working Papers 19-49, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

    Cited by:

    1. Koşar, Gizem & Ransom, Tyler & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2019. "Understanding Migration Aversion Using Elicited Counterfactual Choice Probabilities," IZA Discussion Papers 12271, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Konstantin Büchel & Maximilian V. Ehrlich & Diego Puga & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2019. "Calling from the outside: The role of networks in residential mobility," Working Papers wp2019_1909, CEMFI.

  2. H. Spencer Banzhaf & Kyle Mangum, 2019. "Capitalization as a Two-Part Tariff: The Role of Zoning," Working Papers 19-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Davis & Fernando V. Ferreira, 2017. "Housing Disease and Public School Finances," NBER Working Papers 24140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Patrick Bayer & Kyle Mangum & James W. Roberts, 2016. "Speculative Fever: Investor Contagion in the Housing Bubble," NBER Working Papers 22065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Xuan Zou, 2018. "Can the Greater Fool Theory Explain Bubbles? Evidence from China," Departmental Working Papers 201804, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    2. Anthony A. DeFusco & Charles G. Nathanson & Eric Zwick, 2017. "Speculative Dynamics of Prices and Volume," NBER Working Papers 23449, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bailey, Michael & Cao, Ruiqing & Kuchler, Theresa & Ströbel, Johannes, 2016. "Social Networks and Housing Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 11272, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Repetto, Luca & Solis, Alex, 2017. "The Price of Inattention: Evidence from the Swedish Housing Market," Working Paper Series 2017:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    5. Lara Loewenstein & Paul S. Willen & Christopher L. Foote, 2016. "Cross-sectional patterns of mortgage debt during the housing boom: evidence and implications," Working Papers 16-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, revised 17 Nov 2016.
    6. Michael Bailey & Ruiqing Cao & Theresa Kuchler & Johannes Ströbel, 2016. "Social Networks and Housing Markets," CESifo Working Paper Series 5905, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Carlos J. Perez & Manuel Santos, 2017. "On the Dynamics of Speculation in a Model of Bubbles and Manias," Working Papers 2017-02, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    8. Alessia De Stefani, 2017. "Waves of Optimism: House Price History, Biased Expectations and Credit Cycles," ESE Discussion Papers 282, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    9. Carlos Garriga & Athena Tsouderou & Pedro Gete, 2019. "Housing Dynamics without Homeowners. The Role of I," 2019 Meeting Papers 1407, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Francesca Biagini & Andrea Mazzon & Thilo Meyer-Brandis, 2016. "Liquidity induced asset bubbles via flows of ELMMs," Papers 1611.01440, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2016.

  4. Patrick Bayer & Christopher Geissler & Kyle Mangum & James W. Roberts, 2011. "Speculators and Middlemen: The Strategy and Performance of Investors in the Housing Market," NBER Working Papers 16784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Fernando Ferreira & Joseph Gyourko, 2011. "Anatomy of the Beginning of the Housing Boom: U.S. Neighborhoods and Metropolitan Areas, 1993-2009," NBER Working Papers 17374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Anthony A. DeFusco & Charles G. Nathanson & Eric Zwick, 2017. "Speculative Dynamics of Prices and Volume," NBER Working Papers 23449, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Charles G. Nathanson & Eric Zwick, 2017. "Arrested Development: Theory and Evidence of Supply-Side Speculation in the Housing Market," NBER Working Papers 23030, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Todd Sinai, 2012. "House Price Moments in Boom-Bust Cycles," NBER Chapters, in: Housing and the Financial Crisis, pages 19-68, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Marcus T. Allen & Jessica Rutherford & Ronald Rutherford & Abdullah Yavas, 2018. "Impact of Investors in Distressed Housing Markets," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 56(4), pages 622-652, May.
    6. Donghoon Lee & Wilbert Van der Klaauw & Joseph Tracy & Andrew F. Haughwout, 2011. "Real estate investors, the leverage cycle, and the housing market crisis," Staff Reports 514, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. Yuet-Yee Wong & Randall Wright, 2011. "Buyers, Sellers and Middlemen: Variations on Search-Theoretic Themes," NBER Working Papers 17511, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Patrick Bayer & Kyle Mangum & James W. Roberts, 2016. "Speculative Fever: Investor Contagion in the Housing Bubble," NBER Working Papers 22065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (4) 2016-04-04 2019-04-01 2019-04-08 2019-12-16. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2019-12-16. Author is listed
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2019-12-16. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2019-12-16. Author is listed
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2019-12-16. Author is listed

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