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Nader Habibi

Personal Details

First Name:Nader
Middle Name:
Last Name:Habibi
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha684

Affiliation

Department of Economics, International Business School
Brandeis University

Waltham, Massachusetts (United States)
http://www.brandeis.edu/ief/

:

MS032, P.O. Box 9110, Waltham, MA 02454-9110
RePEc:edi:gsbraus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Nader Habibi, 2010. "Import Demand Behavior of Arab Countries: Recent Trends and Influence of Geopolitical Events," Working Papers 24, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  2. Nader Habibi, 2001. "Fiscal Response to Fluctuating Oil Revenues in Oil Exporting Countries of the Middle East," Working Papers 0136, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 2001.

Articles

  1. M. Fardmanesh & N. Habibi, 2000. "What is Vulnerable During Fiscal Retrenchment?," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 83-108, March.
  2. Bagheri, Fatholla M & Habibi, Nader, 1998. "Political Institutions and Central Bank Independence: A Cross-Country Analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 96(1-2), pages 187-204, July.
  3. Habibi, Nader, 1997. "An Economic Analysis of the Prenuptial Agreement (Mahrieh) in Contemporary Iran," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 281-293, January.
  4. Habibi, Nader, 1994. "Budgetary policy and political liberty: A cross-sectional analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 579-586, April.
  5. Habibi, Nader, 1989. "Cultural conflict and economic development in traditional societies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 134-137, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Nader Habibi, 2001. "Fiscal Response to Fluctuating Oil Revenues in Oil Exporting Countries of the Middle East," Working Papers 0136, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 2001.

    Cited by:

    1. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth: The Case of Iran," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 247-269, June.

Articles

  1. M. Fardmanesh & N. Habibi, 2000. "What is Vulnerable During Fiscal Retrenchment?," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 83-108, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2007. "Fiscal Allocation for Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications of the External Debt Service Constraint," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 702-713, April.

  2. Bagheri, Fatholla M & Habibi, Nader, 1998. "Political Institutions and Central Bank Independence: A Cross-Country Analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 96(1-2), pages 187-204, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Masciandaro, Donato & Romelli, Davide, 2015. "Ups and downs of central bank independence from the Great Inflation to the Great Recession: theory, institutions and empirics," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(03), pages 259-289, December.
    2. Furlan, Benjamin & Gächter, Martin & Krebs, Bob & Oberhofer, Harald, 2012. "Democratization and real exchange rates," Working Papers in Economics 2012-6, University of Salzburg, revised 28 Oct 2013.
    3. Donato Masciandaro & Davide Romelli, 2015. "Ups and Downs. Central Bank Independence from the Great Inflation to the Great Recession: Theory, Institutions and Empirics," BAFFI CAREFIN Working Papers 1503, BAFFI CAREFIN, Centre for Applied Research on International Markets Banking Finance and Regulation, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    4. Yannick Lucotte, 2010. "The choice of adopting inflation targeting in emerging economies: Do domestic institutions matter?," Post-Print hal-00539713, HAL.
    5. Yannick LUCOTTE, 2010. "The Choice of Adopting Inflation Targeting in Emerging Economies: Do Domestic Institutions Matter?," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 1561, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.
    6. Bernd Hayo & Carsten Hefeker, 2001. "Do We Really Need Central Bank Independence? A Critical Re- examination," Macroeconomics 0103006, EconWPA.
    7. Marcello D'Amato & Barbara Pistoresi & Francesco Salsano, 2009. "On the determinants of Central Bank independence in open economies," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(2), pages 107-119.
    8. Brumm, Harold J., 2011. "Inflation and central bank independence: Two-way causality?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(3), pages 220-222, June.
    9. Marc Quintyn, 2009. "Independent agencies: more than a cheap copy of independent central banks?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 267-295, September.
    10. Sven-Olov Daunfeldt & Jörgen Hellström & Mats Landström, 2013. "Why Do Politicians Implement Central Bank Independence Reforms?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(4), pages 427-438, December.
    11. Meseguer, Covadonga, 2006. "Learning and economic policy choices," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 156-178, March.
    12. Hayo, Bernd & Hefeker, Carsten, 2002. "Reconsidering central bank independence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 653-674, November.

  3. Habibi, Nader, 1997. "An Economic Analysis of the Prenuptial Agreement (Mahrieh) in Contemporary Iran," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 281-293, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Siwan Anderson, 2007. "The Economics of Dowry and Brideprice," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(4), pages 151-174, Fall.
    2. Peter T. Leeson & Joshua Pierson, 2016. "Prenups," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 367-400.
    3. Ian Smith, 2003. "The Law and Economics of Marriage Contracts," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(2), pages 201-226, April.

  4. Habibi, Nader, 1994. "Budgetary policy and political liberty: A cross-sectional analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 579-586, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Li-Lin Liang & Andrew J Mirelman, 2014. "Why Do Some Countries Spend More for Health? An Assessment of Sociopolitical Determinants and International Aid for Government Health Expenditures," Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Discussion Paper Series 88182, The World Bank.
    2. Kotera, Go & Okada, Keisuke, 2015. "How Does Democratization Affect the Composition of Government Expenditure?," MPRA Paper 67085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Augustin Fosu, 2010. "The External Debt-Servicing Constraint and Public-Expenditure Composition in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 22(3), pages 378-393.
    4. Mahdavi, Saeid, 2004. "Shifts in the Composition of Government Spending in Response to External Debt Burden," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1139-1157, July.
    5. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin & Ricard Gil, 2003. "Do Democracies Have Different Public Policies than Nondemocracies?," NBER Working Papers 10040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Liang, Li-Lin & Mirelman, Andrew J., 2014. "Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 161-168.
    7. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2007. "Fiscal Allocation for Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications of the External Debt Service Constraint," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 702-713, April.
    8. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Sajjad Faraji Dizaji, 2014. "Political Institutions and Government Spending Behavior in Iran," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201403, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    9. Ajay Tandon & Lisa Fleisher & Rong Li & Wei Aun Yap, 2015. "Reprioritizing Government Spending on Health: Pushing an Elephant up the Stairs?," Working Papers id:7050, eSocialSciences.
    10. Nader Habibi, 2001. "Fiscal Response to Fluctuating Oil Revenues in Oil Exporting Countries of the Middle East," Working Papers 0136, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 2001.
    11. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth: The Case of Iran," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 247-269, June.
    12. Kotera, Go & Okada, Keisuke, 2017. "How does democratization affect the composition of government expenditure?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 145-159.
    13. Lawrence Kenny & Stanley Winer, 2006. "Tax Systems in the World: An Empirical Investigation into the Importance of Tax Bases, Administration Costs, Scale and Political Regime," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(2), pages 181-215, May.
    14. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza, 2011. "Oil revenue shocks and government spending behavior in Iran," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1055-1069.
    15. Profeta, Paola & Puglisi, Riccardo & Scabrosetti, Simona, 2013. "Does democracy affect taxation and government spending? Evidence from developing countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 684-718.

More information

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Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ARA: MENA - Middle East & North Africa (1) 2011-02-12
  2. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2011-02-12

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