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Budgetary policy and political liberty: A cross-sectional analysis


  • Habibi, Nader


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  • Habibi, Nader, 1994. "Budgetary policy and political liberty: A cross-sectional analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 579-586, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:22:y:1994:i:4:p:579-586

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Coase, R H, 1992. "The Institutional Structure of Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 713-719, September.
    2. Ruttan, Vernon W., 1988. "Scale, Size, Technology And Structure: A Personal Perspective," Staff Papers 13832, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    3. Binswanger, Hans P. & Deininger, Klaus & Feder, Gershon, 1995. "Power, distortions, revolt and reform in agricultural land relations," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 42, pages 2659-2772 Elsevier.
    4. Atkinson, L. Jay & Blaich, Oswald P., 1983. "Venezuela: A Prospective Market for Grain and Livestock Products," Foreign Agricultural Economic Report (FAER) 147215, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. John M. Brewster, 1950. "The Machine Process in Agriculture and Industry," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 32(1), pages 69-81.
    6. Kislev, Yoav & Peterson, Willis L., 1991. "Economies Of Scale In Agriculture: A Reexamination Of The Evidence," Staff Papers 13652, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    7. Putterman, Louis, 1983. "A modified collective agriculture in rural growth-with-equity: Reconsidering the private, unimodal solution," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 77-100, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Li-Lin Liang & Andrew J Mirelman, 2014. "Why Do Some Countries Spend More for Health? An Assessment of Sociopolitical Determinants and International Aid for Government Health Expenditures," Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Discussion Paper Series 88182, The World Bank.
    2. Kotera, Go & Okada, Keisuke, 2015. "How Does Democratization Affect the Composition of Government Expenditure?," MPRA Paper 67085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Augustin Fosu, 2010. "The External Debt-Servicing Constraint and Public-Expenditure Composition in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 22(3), pages 378-393.
    4. Mahdavi, Saeid, 2004. "Shifts in the Composition of Government Spending in Response to External Debt Burden," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1139-1157, July.
    5. Casey B. Mulligan & Ricard Gil & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2004. "Do Democracies Have Different Public Policies than Nondemocracies?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(1), pages 51-74, Winter.
    6. Liang, Li-Lin & Mirelman, Andrew J., 2014. "Why do some countries spend more for health? An assessment of sociopolitical determinants and international aid for government health expenditures," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 161-168.
    7. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2007. "Fiscal Allocation for Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications of the External Debt Service Constraint," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 702-713, April.
    8. Sajjad Faraji Dizaji & Mohammad Reza Farzanegan, 2014. "Political Institutions and Government Spending Behavior in Iran," CESifo Working Paper Series 4620, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Ajay Tandon & Lisa Fleisher & Rong Li & Wei Aun Yap, 2015. "Reprioritizing Government Spending on Health: Pushing an Elephant up the Stairs?," Working Papers id:7050, eSocialSciences.
    10. Nader Habibi, 2001. "Fiscal Response to Fluctuating Oil Revenues in Oil Exporting Countries of the Middle East," Working Papers 0136, Economic Research Forum, revised 11 2001.
    11. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth: The Case of Iran," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(3), pages 247-269, June.
    12. repec:eee:jeborg:v:137:y:2017:i:c:p:145-159 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Lawrence Kenny & Stanley Winer, 2006. "Tax Systems in the World: An Empirical Investigation into the Importance of Tax Bases, Administration Costs, Scale and Political Regime," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(2), pages 181-215, May.
    14. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza, 2011. "Oil revenue shocks and government spending behavior in Iran," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1055-1069.
    15. Profeta, Paola & Puglisi, Riccardo & Scabrosetti, Simona, 2013. "Does democracy affect taxation and government spending? Evidence from developing countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 684-718.

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