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Rowena Gray

Personal Details

First Name:Rowena
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gray
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgr390
http://rowenagray.weebly.com/
Twitter: @rowenagray6
Terminal Degree:2011 Economics Department; University of California-Davis (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-Merced

Merced, California (United States)
http://economics.ucmerced.edu/
RePEc:edi:ecucmus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Sarah Quincy & Rowena Gray, 2022. "Boomtowns: Local Shocks and Inequality in 1920s California," Working Papers 0223, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  2. Rowena Gray & Greg C. Wright, 2022. "A Rising Tide? The Local Incidence of the Second Wave of Globalization," CESifo Working Paper Series 9725, CESifo.
  3. Gray, Rowena & Bowman, Rocco, 2020. "Locating the Manhattan housing market: GIS evidence for 1880-1910," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2020-01, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  4. Gray, Rowena, 2020. "Inequality in nineteenth century Manhattan: Evidence from the housing market," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2020-02, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  5. Paul Gaggl & Rowena Gray & Ioana Marinescu & Miguel Morin, 2019. "Does Electricity Drive Structural Transformation? Evidence from the United States," NBER Working Papers 26477, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Gray, Rowena, 2018. "Selection bias in historical housing data," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2018-01, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
  7. Rowena Gray & Gaia Narciso & Gaspare Tortorici, 2017. "Globalization, Agricultural Markets and Mass Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1713, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  8. Rowena Gray & Giulia Montresor & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "Processing Immigration Shocks: Firm Responses on the Innovation Margin," CESifo Working Paper Series 6624, CESifo.
  9. Campaniello, N & Gray, R & Mastrobuoni, G, 2016. "Returns to Education in Criminal Organizations: Did Going to College Help Michael Corleone?," Economics Discussion Papers 16188, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  10. Campaniello, N & Gray, R & Mastrobuoni, G, 2015. "Returns to Education and Experience in Criminal Organizations: Evidence from the Italian-American Mafia," Economics Discussion Papers 13795, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  11. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2012. "Geography is not Destiny. Geography, Institutions and Literacy in England, 1837-1863," Working Papers 0015, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  12. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

Articles

  1. Gaggl, Paul & Gray, Rowena & Marinescu, Ioana & Morin, Miguel, 2021. "Does electricity drive structural transformation? Evidence from the United States," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
  2. Rowena Gray & Rocco Bowman, 2021. "Locating the Manhattan housing market: GIS evidence for 1880-1910," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(3), pages 151-171, July.
  3. Gray, Rowena & Montresor, Giulia & Wright, Greg C., 2020. "Processing immigration shocks: Firm responses on the innovation margin," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C).
  4. Gray, Rowena & Narciso, Gaia & Tortorici, Gaspare, 2019. "Globalization, agricultural markets and mass migration: Italy, 1881–1912," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
  5. Gray, Rowena, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living Since the Civil War. By Robert J. Gordon. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2016. Pp. 784, $39.95, cloth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(3), pages 960-962, September.
  6. Campaniello, Nadia & Gray, Rowena & Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2016. "Returns to education in criminal organizations: Did going to college help Michael Corleone?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 242-258.
  7. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2014. "Geography is not destiny: geography, institutions and literacy in England, 1837–63," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 1042-1069.
  8. Gray, Rowena, 2013. "Taking technology to task: The skill content of technological change in early twentieth century United States," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-367.

Chapters

  1. Rowena Gray, 2018. "Crime and Violence," Palgrave Studies in Economic History, in: Matthias Blum & Christopher L. Colvin (ed.), An Economist’s Guide to Economic History, chapter 19, pages 159-165, Palgrave Macmillan.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Electrification, skills and manufacturing
      by Chris Colvin in NEP-HIS blog on 2012-01-29 00:15:01

Working papers

  1. Gray, Rowena & Bowman, Rocco, 2020. "Locating the Manhattan housing market: GIS evidence for 1880-1910," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2020-01, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Gray, Rowena, 2020. "Inequality in nineteenth century Manhattan: Evidence from the housing market," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2020-02, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.

  2. Paul Gaggl & Rowena Gray & Ioana Marinescu & Miguel Morin, 2019. "Does Electricity Drive Structural Transformation? Evidence from the United States," NBER Working Papers 26477, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Vidart, 2021. "Human Capital, Female Employment, and Electricity: Evidence from the Early 20th Century United States," Working papers 2021-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2022.
    2. Björn Brey, 2021. "The Long-run Gains from the Early Adoption of Electricity," Working Papers ECARES 2021-23, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Sergio Petralia, 2020. "GPTs and Growth: Evidence on the Technological Adoption of Electrical & Electronic Technologies in the 1920s," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 2033, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Aug 2020.
    4. Fried, Stephie & Lagakos, David, 2021. "Rural electrification, migration and structural transformation: Evidence from Ethiopia," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    5. Sarah Quincy & Rowena Gray, 2022. "Boomtowns: Local Shocks and Inequality in 1920s California," Working Papers 0223, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  3. Rowena Gray & Gaia Narciso & Gaspare Tortorici, 2017. "Globalization, Agricultural Markets and Mass Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1713, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Gaia Narciso, 2018. "Crop prices and migration in Vietnam," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-142, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  4. Rowena Gray & Giulia Montresor & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "Processing Immigration Shocks: Firm Responses on the Innovation Margin," CESifo Working Paper Series 6624, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Rowena Gray & Giulia Montresor & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "Processing Immigration Shocks: Firm Responses on the Innovation Margin," CESifo Working Paper Series 6624, CESifo.
    2. S, Minkyu., 2021. "The impact of trade on R&D: Evidence from UK firms," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2151, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Peri, Giovanni & Wright, Greg C., 2018. "Immigration, trade and productivity in services: Evidence from U.K. firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 88-108.
    4. Mbaye, Linguère Mously & Okara, Assi & Tani, Massimiliano, 2022. "Labor Mobility and Innovation in Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 15004, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Linguère Mously Mbaye & Assi Okara & Massimiliano Tani, 2022. "Working Paper 361 - Labour mobility and innovation in Africa," Working Paper Series 2487, African Development Bank.

  5. Campaniello, N & Gray, R & Mastrobuoni, G, 2016. "Returns to Education in Criminal Organizations: Did Going to College Help Michael Corleone?," Economics Discussion Papers 16188, University of Essex, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. López Cruz, Iván G., 2019. "Policing, schooling and human capital accumulation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 572-597.
    2. Caglayan, Mustafa & Flamini, Alessandro & Jahanshahi, Babak, 2021. "Hindering human capital accumulation: A hidden cost of the silent mafia?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 188(C), pages 828-845.
    3. Nguyen, Hieu T.M., 2019. "Do more educated neighbourhoods experience less property crime? Evidence from Indonesia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 27-37.
    4. Federico Cingano & Marco Tonello, 2020. "Law Enforcement, Social Control and Organized Crime: Evidence from Local Government Dismissals in Italy," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 6(2), pages 221-254, July.

  6. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2012. "Geography is not Destiny. Geography, Institutions and Literacy in England, 1837-1863," Working Papers 0015, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Nina Boberg-Fazlic & Markus Lampe & Pablo Martinelli Lasheras & Paul Sharp, 2020. "Winners and Losers from Enclosure: Evidence from Danish Land Inequality 1682-1895," Working Papers 0178, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Joerg Baten & Ralph Hippe, 2018. "Geography, land inequality and regional numeracy in Europe in historical perspective," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 79-109, March.
    3. Ezcurra, Roberto & Zuazu, Izaskun, 2019. "Political equality and quality of government," MPRA Paper 96476, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. David Mitch, 2012. "Landed society, farm size and support for public schooling in 19th-century England," Working Papers 12014, Economic History Society.
    5. Kelly, Morgan & Mokyr, Joel & Grada, Cormac O, 2015. "Roots of the Industrial Revolution," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 248, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    6. Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai, 2014. "Rethinking spatial inequalities in development: the primacy of politics and power relations," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-029-14, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    7. David Mitch, 2010. "Did high stakes testing policies result in divergence or convergence in educational performance and financing across counties in Victorian England?," Working Papers 10011, Economic History Society.
    8. Morgan Kelly & Joel Mokyr & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2015. "Roots of the Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 201524, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

  7. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Molinder, Jakob & Karlsson, Tobias & Enflo, Kerstin, 2019. "More Power to the People: Electricity Adoption, Technological Change and Social Conflict," Lund Papers in Economic History 206, Lund University, Department of Economic History, revised 13 Oct 2020.
    2. Daniela Vidart, 2021. "Human Capital, Female Employment, and Electricity: Evidence from the Early 20th Century United States," Working papers 2021-08, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2022.
    3. Xie, Bin, 2017. "The Effects of Immigration Quotas on Wages, the Great Black Migration, and Industrial Development," IZA Discussion Papers 11214, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Feng, Andy & Graetz, Georg, 2015. "Rise of the Machines: The Effects of Labor-Saving Innovations on Jobs and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 8836, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Miguel Morin, 2015. "The Labor Market Consequences of Electricity Adoption: Concrete Evidence from the Great Depression," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1554, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Davide Consoli & Francesco Rentocchini & Francesco Vona, 2014. "That was then, this is now: Skills and Routinization in the 2000s," Working Papers hal-03460412, HAL.
    7. Michaels, Guy & Rauch, Ferdinand & Redding, Stephen, 2019. "Task specialization in U.S. cities from 1880-2000," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85163, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Davide Consoli & Giovanni Marin & Alberto Marzucchi & Francesco Vona, 2015. "Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital?," SEEDS Working Papers 1015, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised May 2015.
    9. Frey, Carl Benedikt & Osborne, Michael A., 2017. "The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 254-280.
    10. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    11. Jeanne Lafortune & José Tessada & Ethan Lewis, 2015. "People and Machines A Look at the Evolving Relationship Between Capital and Skill In Manufacturing 1860-1930 Using Immigration Shocks," Documentos de Trabajo 463, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
    12. Paul Gaggl & Rowena Gray & Ioana Marinescu & Miguel Morin, 2019. "Does Electricity Drive Structural Transformation? Evidence from the United States," CESifo Working Paper Series 7930, CESifo.
    13. Davide Consoli & Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2016. "Polarization and the growth of low-skill employment in Spanish Local Labor Markets," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1628, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Nov 2016.
    14. Leticia Arroyo Abad & Noel Maurer & Blanca Sánchez-Alonso, 2020. "Paesani versus Paisanos: The Relative Failure of Spanish Immigrants in Buenos Aires during the Age of Mass Migration," Working Papers 0189, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    15. Jeremy Atack & Robert A. Margo & Paul W. Rhode, 2019. ""Automation" of Manufacturing in the Late Nineteenth Century: The Hand and Machine Labor Study," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 51-70, Spring.
    16. Joonmo Cho & Jinha Kim, 2018. "Identifying Factors Reinforcing Robotization: Interactive Forces of Employment, Working Hour and Wage," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(2), pages 1-21, February.
    17. Zachary Ward, 2016. "The Role of English Fluency in Migrant Assimilation: Evidence from United States History," CEH Discussion Papers 049, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    18. Aránzazu Guillán Montero & David Le Blanc, 2019. "Lessons for Today from Past Periods of Rapid Technological Change," Working Papers 158, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.

Articles

  1. Gaggl, Paul & Gray, Rowena & Marinescu, Ioana & Morin, Miguel, 2021. "Does electricity drive structural transformation? Evidence from the United States," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Rowena Gray & Rocco Bowman, 2021. "Locating the Manhattan housing market: GIS evidence for 1880-1910," Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(3), pages 151-171, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Gray, Rowena & Montresor, Giulia & Wright, Greg C., 2020. "Processing immigration shocks: Firm responses on the innovation margin," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Gray, Rowena & Narciso, Gaia & Tortorici, Gaspare, 2019. "Globalization, agricultural markets and mass migration: Italy, 1881–1912," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Narciso, Gaia, 2020. "Crop prices and the individual decision to migrate," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    2. Yannay Spitzer & Gaspare Tortorici & Ariell Zimran, 2020. "International Migration Responses to Modern Europe’s Most Destructive Earthquake: Messina and Reggio Calabria, 1908," NBER Working Papers 27506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  5. Campaniello, Nadia & Gray, Rowena & Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2016. "Returns to education in criminal organizations: Did going to college help Michael Corleone?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 242-258.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2014. "Geography is not destiny: geography, institutions and literacy in England, 1837–63," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 1042-1069.

    Cited by:

    1. Nina Boberg-Fazlic & Markus Lampe & Pablo Martinelli Lasheras & Paul Sharp, 2020. "Winners and Losers from Enclosure: Evidence from Danish Land Inequality 1682-1895," Working Papers 0178, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Cinnirella, Francesco & Hornung, Erik, 2016. "Land Inequality, Education, and Marriage: Empirical Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia," CEPR Discussion Papers 11486, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Andersson, Jens & Berger, Thor, 2016. "Elites and the Expansion of Education in 19th-century Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 149, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    4. Boberg-Fazlić, Nina & Lampe, Markus & Martinelli Lasheras, Pablo & Sharp, Paul, 2022. "Winners and losers from agrarian reform: Evidence from Danish land inequality 1682–1895," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C).
    5. Beltrán Tapia, Francisco J. & Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2018. "Inequality and education in pre-industrial economies: Evidence from Spain," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 81-101.
    6. David Mitch, 2012. "Landed society, farm size and support for public schooling in 19th-century England," Working Papers 12014, Economic History Society.
    7. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
    8. David Mitch, 2010. "Did high stakes testing policies result in divergence or convergence in educational performance and financing across counties in Victorian England?," Working Papers 10011, Economic History Society.

  7. Gray, Rowena, 2013. "Taking technology to task: The skill content of technological change in early twentieth century United States," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-367. See citations under working paper version above.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 14 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (12) 2012-01-25 2012-03-08 2016-02-12 2016-03-17 2018-03-05 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-03-09 2020-03-09 2020-06-08 2022-03-28 2022-06-13. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (6) 2012-03-08 2018-03-05 2020-03-09 2020-03-09 2022-03-28 2022-06-13. Author is listed
  3. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (4) 2012-01-25 2019-11-25 2020-06-08 2022-03-28
  4. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (4) 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-06-08 2022-06-13
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2019-11-25 2019-12-16 2020-06-08
  6. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2017-10-22 2017-12-18
  7. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2016-02-12 2016-03-17
  8. NEP-INT: International Trade (2) 2017-12-18 2022-06-13
  9. NEP-TID: Technology & Industrial Dynamics (2) 2019-11-25 2020-06-08
  10. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2017-12-18
  11. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2017-10-22
  12. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2012-03-08
  13. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-01-25
  14. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2016-03-17
  15. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2017-12-18

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