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Rowena Gray

Personal Details

First Name:Rowena
Middle Name:
Last Name:Gray
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgr390
http://rowenagray.weebly.com/
Twitter: @rowenagray6
Terminal Degree:2011 Economics Department; University of California-Davis (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-Merced

Merced, California (United States)
http://economics.ucmerced.edu/

:


RePEc:edi:ecucmus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Rowena Gray & Gaia Narciso & Gaspare Tortorici, 2017. "Globalization, Agricultural Markets and Mass Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1713, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Rowena Gray & Giulia Montresor & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "Processing Immigration Shocks: Firm Responses on the Innovation Margin," CESifo Working Paper Series 6624, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Campaniello, N & Gray, R & Mastrobuoni, G, 2016. "Returns to Education in Criminal Organizations: Did Going to College Help Michael Corleone?," Economics Discussion Papers 16188, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  4. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2012. "Geography is not Destiny. Geography, Institutions and Literacy in England, 1837-1863," Working Papers 0015, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  5. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

Articles

  1. Gray, Rowena, 2017. "The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living Since the Civil War. By Robert J. Gordon. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2016. Pp. 784, $39.95, cloth," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(03), pages 960-962, September.
  2. Campaniello, Nadia & Gray, Rowena & Mastrobuoni, Giovanni, 2016. "Returns to education in criminal organizations: Did going to college help Michael Corleone?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 242-258.
  3. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2014. "Geography is not destiny: geography, institutions and literacy in England, 1837–63," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 1042-1069.
  4. Gray, Rowena, 2013. "Taking technology to task: The skill content of technological change in early twentieth century United States," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-367.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Electrification, skills and manufacturing
      by Chris Colvin in NEP-HIS blog on 2012-01-29 00:15:01

Working papers

  1. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2012. "Geography is not Destiny. Geography, Institutions and Literacy in England, 1837-1863," Working Papers 0015, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Kelly, Morgan & Mokyr, Joel & Grada, Cormac O, 2015. "Roots of the Industrial Revolution," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 248, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    2. Joerg Baten & Ralph Hippe, 2018. "Geography, land inequality and regional numeracy in Europe in historical perspective," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 79-109, March.
    3. Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai, 2014. "Rethinking spatial inequalities in development: the primacy of politics and power relations," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-029-14, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    4. Morgan Kelly & Joel Mokyr & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2015. "Roots of the Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 201524, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

  2. Rowena Gray, 2011. "Taking Technology to Task: The Skill Content of Technological Change in Early Twentieth Century United States," Working Papers 0009, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Xie, Bin, 2017. "The Effects of Immigration Quotas on Wages, the Great Black Migration, and Industrial Development," IZA Discussion Papers 11214, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Davide Consoli & Francesco Vona & Francesco Rentocchini, 2016. "That was then, this is now: skills and routinization in the 2000s," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(5), pages 847-866.
    3. Joonmo Cho & Jinha Kim, 2018. "Identifying Factors Reinforcing Robotization: Interactive Forces of Employment, Working Hour and Wage," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-21, February.
    4. Feng, Andy & Graetz, Georg, 2015. "Rise of the Machines: The Effects of Labor-Saving Innovations on Jobs and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 8836, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Guy Michaels & Ferdinand Rauch & Stephen J. Redding, 2013. "Task Specialization in U.S. Cities from 1880-2000," NBER Working Papers 18715, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Miguel Morin, 2015. "The Labor Market Consequences of Electricity Adoption: Concrete Evidence from the Great Depression," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1554, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    7. Zachary Ward, 2016. "The Role of English Fluency in Migrant Assimilation: Evidence from United States History," CEH Discussion Papers 049, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    8. Lafortune, Jeanne & Tessada, José & Lewis, Ethan Gatewood, 2015. "People and Machines: A Look at the Evolving Relationship Between Capital and Skill in Manufacturing 1860-1930 Using Immigration Shocks," IZA Discussion Papers 9217, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Davide Consoli & Giovanni Marin & Alberto Marzucchi & Francesco Vona, 2015. "Do green jobs differ from non-green jobs in terms of skills and human capital?," SEEDS Working Papers 1015, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised May 2015.
    10. Frey, Carl Benedikt & Osborne, Michael A., 2017. "The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 254-280.
    11. Stefan Leknes & Jørgen Modalsli, 2018. "Who benefited from industrialization? The local effects of hydropower technology adoption," Discussion Papers 874, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    12. Davide Consoli & Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2016. "Polarization and the growth of low-skill employment in Spanish Local Labor Markets," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1628, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Nov 2016.

Articles

  1. Gregory Clark & Rowena Gray, 2014. "Geography is not destiny: geography, institutions and literacy in England, 1837–63," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(4), pages 1042-1069.

    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Cinnirella & Erik Hornung, 2016. "Land Inequality, Education, and Marriage: Empirical Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Prussia," CESifo Working Paper Series 6072, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Modalsli, Jørgen, 2018. "The regional dispersion of income inequality in nineteenth-century Norway," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 62-79.
    3. Andersson, Jens & Berger, Thor, 2016. "Elites and the Expansion of Education in 19th-century Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 149, Lund University, Department of Economic History.

  2. Gray, Rowena, 2013. "Taking technology to task: The skill content of technological change in early twentieth century United States," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 351-367. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2012-01-25 2012-03-08 2016-03-17. Author is listed
  2. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (2) 2017-10-22 2017-12-18. Author is listed
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2017-12-18
  4. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2017-10-22
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2016-03-17
  6. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2012-01-25
  7. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2012-03-08
  8. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2017-12-18
  9. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-01-25
  10. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2016-03-17
  11. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2017-12-18
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2012-03-08

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