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Kristine M. Brown

Personal Details

First Name:Kristine
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Brown
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr284
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://ler.illinois.edu/brown
Terminal Degree:2007 Department of Economics; University of California-Berkeley (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Urbana-Champaign, Illinois (United States)
http://www.economics.illinois.edu/

: (217) 333-0120

1407 W. Gregory Drive, David Kinley Hall, Room 214 (MC 707), Urbana IL 61801
RePEc:edi:deuiuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Kristine M. Brown, 2014. "The Tradeoff Between Health and Wealth in Retirement Decisions," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2014-7, Center for Retirement Research.

Articles

  1. Brown, Kristine M., 2013. "The link between pensions and retirement timing: Lessons from California teachers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 1-14.
  2. Kristine M. Brown & Ron A. Laschever, 2012. "When They're Sixty-Four: Peer Effects and the Timing of Retirement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 90-115, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Kristine M. Brown & Ron A. Laschever, 2012. "When They're Sixty-Four: Peer Effects and the Timing of Retirement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 90-115, July.

    Mentioned in:

    1. When They're Sixty-Four: Peer Effects and the Timing of Retirement (AEJ:AE 2012) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Brown, Kristine M., 2013. "The link between pensions and retirement timing: Lessons from California teachers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 1-14.

    Cited by:

    1. Manoli, Dayanand S. & Weber, Andrea, 2016. "The Effects of the Early Retirement Age on Retirement Decisions," CEPR Discussion Papers 11491, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Brinch, Christian N. & Hernæs, Erik & Jia, Zhiyang, 2015. "Salience and Social Security Benefits," Memorandum 13/2015, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    3. Manoli, Dayanand & Mullen, Kathleen & Wagner, Mathis, 2014. "Policy Variation, Labor Supply Elasticities, and a Structural Model of Retirement," IZA Discussion Papers 8659, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Isabel Z. Martinez & Emmanuel Saez & Michael Siegenthaler, 2018. "Intertemporal Labor Supply Substitution? Evidence from the Swiss Income Tax Holidays," NBER Working Papers 24634, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Day Manoli & Andrea Weber, 2014. "Nonparametric Evidence on the Effects of Financial Incentives on Retirement Decisions," CESifo Working Paper Series 4619, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Teresa Ghilarducci & Michael Papadopoulos & Siavash Radpour, 2017. "Relative Wages in Aging America: The Baby Boomer Effect," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2017-03, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    7. Dongwoo Kim & Cory Koedel & Shawn Ni & Michael Podgursky & Weiwei Wu, 2016. "Pensions and Late-Career Teacher Retention," Working Papers 1708, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised Jul 2017.
    8. Fitzpatrick, Maria D., 2017. "Pension-spiking, free-riding, and the effects of pension reform on teachers' earnings," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 57-74.
    9. Eugster, Beatrix & Deuchert, Eva, 2017. "Income and Substitution Effects of a Disability Insurance Reform," Economics Working Paper Series 1709, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    10. Laun, Lisa, 2017. "The effect of age-targeted tax credits on labor force participation of older workers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 102-118.
    11. Collins, Matthew & Curtis, John, 2018. "Bunching of residential building energy performance certificates at threshold values," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 211(C), pages 662-676.
    12. Deuchert, E. & Eugster, B., 2016. "Crawling Up the Cash Cliff? Behavioral Responses to a Disability Insurance Reform," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Håkan Selin, 2017. "What happens to the husband’s retirement decision when the wife’s retirement incentives change?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 24(3), pages 432-458, June.
    14. Teresa Ghilarducci, Amanda Novello, 2017. "The Labor Consequences of Financializing Pensions," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2017-05, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    15. David Powell, 2015. "Do Payroll Taxes in the United States Create Bunching at Kink Points?," Working Papers wp327, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

  2. Kristine M. Brown & Ron A. Laschever, 2012. "When They're Sixty-Four: Peer Effects and the Timing of Retirement," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 90-115, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Kondo, Ayako & Shoji, Masahiro, 2016. "Peer Effects in Employment Status: Evidence from Housing Lotteries for Forced Evacuees in Fukushima," IZA Discussion Papers 9708, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Maria D. Fitzpatrick & Michael F. Lovenheim, 2013. "Early Retirement Incentives and Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 19281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Unterhofer, Ulrike & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2017. "Fathers, Parental Leave and Gender Norms," IZA Discussion Papers 10712, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. John Chalmers & Woodrow T. Johnson & Jonathan Reuter, 2012. "The Effect of Pension Design on Employer Costs and Employee Retirement Choices: Evidence from Oregon," NBER Chapters,in: Retirement Benefits for State and Local Employees: Designing Pension Plans for the Twenty-First Century National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ulrike Unterhofer & Katharina Wrohlich, 2017. "Fathers, Parental Leave and Gender Norms," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1657, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Xu, Yilan & Beller, Andrea H. & Roberts, Brent W. & Brown, Jeffrey R., 2015. "Personality and young adult financial distress," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 90-100.
    7. Meltem Daysal, N. & Orsini, C., 2012. "Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Health Behavior," Discussion Paper 2012-025, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    8. Cory Koedel & P. Brett Xiang, 2017. "Pension Enhancements and the Retention of Public Employees," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 70(2), pages 519-551, March.
    9. Wrohlich, Katharina & Unterhofer, Ulrike, 2017. "External Effects of 'Daddy Months': How Fathers' Parental Leave Changes Social Norms," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168297, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Brown, Kristine M., 2013. "The link between pensions and retirement timing: Lessons from California teachers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 1-14.
    11. Dieterle, Steven G. & Snell, Andy, 2016. "A simple diagnostic to investigate instrument validity and heterogeneous effects when using a single instrument," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 76-86.
    12. Mugerman, Yevgeny & Sade, Orly & Shayo, Moses, 2014. "Long term savings decisions: Financial reform, peer effects and ethnicity," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 235-253.
    13. Chinhui Juhn & Kristin McCue, 2012. "Workplace Characteristics and Employment of Older Workers," Working Papers 12-31, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2014-06-02. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2014-06-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2014-06-02. Author is listed

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