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Peer Effects in Employment Status: Evidence from Housing Lotteries for Forced Evacuees in Fukushima

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  • Kondo, Ayako
  • Shoji, Masahiro

Abstract

Does a high peer employment rate increase individual employment probability? We exploit the random assignment of temporary housing to evacuees from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident to identify the effect of neighbors’ employment rates on an individual’s probability of finding a job post-evacuation. Using unique survey data, we find that a one standard deviation increase in the initial employment rate of an individual’s peers makes the hazard of restarting work 1.41 times larger during the six months after move-in. We also show suggestive evidence for social norm to work as an underlying mechanism for the observed peer effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Kondo, Ayako & Shoji, Masahiro, 2017. "Peer Effects in Employment Status: Evidence from Housing Lotteries for Forced Evacuees in Fukushima," GLO Discussion Paper Series 23, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kentaro Nakajima & Kensuke Teshima, 2018. "Identifying Neighborhood Effects among Firms: Evidence from Location Lotteries of the Tokyo Tsukiji Fish Market," 2018 Meeting Papers 575, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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