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Simon Davies

Personal Details

First Name:Simon
Middle Name:
Last Name:Davies
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pda183
http://www.simon-davies.org.uk/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Bath

Bath, United Kingdom
http://www.bath.ac.uk/economics/

: +44 (0)1225 383799
+44 (0)1225 323423
Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY
RePEc:edi:debatuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Hinks, Tim & Davies, Simon, 2015. "Intentions to return : evidence from Romanian migrants," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7166, The World Bank.
  2. Davies, Simon & Hinks, Tim, 2009. "Crime and Happiness Amongst Heads of Households in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 15969, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
  3. Davies, Simon, 2007. "Remittances as insurance for idiosyncratic and covariate shocks in Malawi: The importance of distance and relationship," MPRA Paper 4463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Davies, Simon & Davey, James, 2007. "A regional multiplier approach to estimating the impact of cash transfers: The case of cash aid in rural Malawi," MPRA Paper 3724, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Record, Richard & Davies, Simon, 2007. "Determinants and impact of private sector investment in Malawi: evidence from the 2006 investment climate survey," MPRA Paper 3818, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Davies, Simon & Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2006. "Mental Accounting and Remittances: A Study of Malawian Households," MPRA Paper 3603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Davies, Simon, 2006. "Income, gender and consumption: A study of Malawian households," MPRA Paper 3944, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Simon Davies, 2011. "What Motivates Gifts? Intra-Family Transfers in Rural Malawi," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 473-492, September.
  2. Simon Davies, 2011. "Income, gender, and consumption: a study of Malawian households," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 44(2), pages 1-25, January-M.
  3. Simon Davies, 2010. "Do shocks have a persistent impact on consumption?," Progress in Development Studies, , vol. 10(1), pages 75-79, January.
  4. Simon Davies & Tim Hinks, 2010. "Crime and Happiness Amongst Heads of Households in Malawi," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 457-476, August.
  5. Davies, Simon & Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2009. "Mental accounting and remittances: A study of rural Malawian households," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 321-334, June.
  6. Simon Davies & James Davey, 2008. "A Regional Multiplier Approach to Estimating the Impact of Cash Transfers on the Market: The Case of Cash Transfers in Rural Malawi," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 91-111, January.
  7. Tim Hinks & Simon Davies, 2008. "Life satisfaction in Malawi and the importance of relative consumption, polygamy and religion," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 888-904.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Hinks, Tim & Davies, Simon, 2015. "Intentions to return : evidence from Romanian migrants," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7166, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Magdalena VELCIU & Liliana GRECU, 2017. "Designing The Return Migration Of Romanian Students," SEA - Practical Application of Science, Fundația Română pentru Inteligența Afacerii, Editorial Department, issue 13, pages 187-190, May.
    2. Ardiana Gashi & Nick Adnett, 2015. "The Determinants of Return Migration: Evidence for Kosovo," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 17(2), pages 57-81, December.
    3. Mihaela Simionescu, 2017. "Macroeconomic determinants of migration from Romania to Italy," Computational Methods in Social Sciences (CMSS), "Nicolae Titulescu" University of Bucharest, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 5(1), pages 05-10, June.

  2. Davies, Simon & Hinks, Tim, 2009. "Crime and Happiness Amongst Heads of Households in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 15969, University of Bath, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Cheng, Zhiming & Smyth, Russell, 2015. "Crime victimization, neighborhood safety and happiness in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 424-435.
    2. Iddisah Sulemana, 2015. "An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Social Capital and Subjective Well-Being in Ghana," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(5), pages 1299-1321, October.
    3. Burhan, Nik Ahmad Sufian & Kurniawan, Yohan & Sidek, Abdul Halim & Mohamad, Mohd Rosli, 2014. "Crimes and the Bell Curve: The Role of People with High, Average, and Low Intelligence," MPRA Paper 77314, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Mattheus Brenig & Till Proeger, 2018. "Putting a Price Tag on Security: Subjective Well-Being and Willingness-to-Pay for Crime Reduction in Europe," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 145-166, January.
    5. Alem, Yonas & Colmer, Jonathan, 2014. "Optimal Expectations and the Welfare Cost of Climate Variability," Discussion Papers dp-14-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
    6. Christopher Ambrey & Christopher Fleming & Matthew Manning, 2014. "Perception or Reality, What Matters Most When it Comes to Crime in Your Neighbourhood?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 119(2), pages 877-896, November.
    7. Masanori Kuroki, 2013. "Crime Victimization and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Happiness Data," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 783-794, June.
    8. Stéphane Mahuteau & Rong Zhu, 2016. "Crime Victimisation and Subjective Well‐Being: Panel Evidence From Australia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(11), pages 1448-1463, November.
    9. Christopher L Ambrey & Christopher M Fleming & Matthew Manning, 2013. "The life satisfaction approach to estimating the cost of crime: An individual's willingness-to-pay for crime reduction," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201301, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.
    10. Yonas Alem & Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Don't Worry, Be Happy: The Welfare Cost of Climate Variability � A Subjective Well-Being Approach," GRI Working Papers 118, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    11. Brenig, Mattheus & Proeger, Till, 2016. "Putting a price tag on security: Subjective well-being and willingness-to-pay for crime reduction in Europe," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 278, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    12. Douhou, Salima & Van Soest, Arthur, 2013. "Explaining subjective well-being: The role of victimization, trust, health, and social norms," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 52-78.
    13. Alem, Yonas & Köhlin, Gunnar, 2012. "Life Satisfaction in Urban Ethiopia: Trends and determinants," Working Papers in Economics 548, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    14. Iddisah Sulemana, 2015. "The Effect of Fear of Crime and Crime Victimization on Subjective Well-Being in Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 121(3), pages 849-872, April.

  3. Davies, Simon, 2007. "Remittances as insurance for idiosyncratic and covariate shocks in Malawi: The importance of distance and relationship," MPRA Paper 4463, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Richter, Susan M., 2008. "The Insurance Role of Remittances on Household Credit Demand," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6261, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Ibrahim Sirkeci & Jeffrey H. Cohen & Dilip Ratha, 2012. "Migration and Remittances during the Global Financial Crisis and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13092, October.
    3. Iliana V. Kohler & Hans-Peter Kohler & Philip Anglewicz & Jere Behrman, 2012. "Intergenerational Transfers in the Era of HIV/AIDS: Evidence from Rural Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(27), pages 775-834, December.
    4. Joanne Linnerooth-Bayer & Stefan Hochrainer-Stigler, 2015. "Financial instruments for disaster risk management and climate change adaptation," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 85-100, November.

  4. Davies, Simon & Davey, James, 2007. "A regional multiplier approach to estimating the impact of cash transfers: The case of cash aid in rural Malawi," MPRA Paper 3724, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Mideros A. & Gassmann F. & Mohnen P., 2013. "Estimation of rates of return of social protection instruments. Making the case for non-contributory social transfers in Cambodia," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

  5. Record, Richard & Davies, Simon, 2007. "Determinants and impact of private sector investment in Malawi: evidence from the 2006 investment climate survey," MPRA Paper 3818, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Durevall, Dick. & Mussa, Richard., 2010. "Employment diagnostic analysis : Malawi," ILO Working Papers 994614443402676, International Labour Organization.

  6. Davies, Simon & Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2006. "Mental Accounting and Remittances: A Study of Malawian Households," MPRA Paper 3603, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Davies, Simon & Davey, James, 2007. "A regional multiplier approach to estimating the impact of cash transfers: The case of cash aid in rural Malawi," MPRA Paper 3724, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Simon Davies, 2011. "What Motivates Gifts? Intra-Family Transfers in Rural Malawi," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 473-492, September.

    Cited by:

    1. David Zimmer, 2011. "The Effects of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program on Insurance Status and Health Care Utilization of Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 373-383, June.
    2. Beyene, Berhe Mekonnen, 2012. "The Link between International Remittances and Private Interhousehold Transfers," Memorandum 14/2012, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    3. Jay Zagorsky, 2013. "Do People Save or Spend Their Inheritances? Understanding What Happens to Inherited Wealth," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 64-76, March.
    4. Elly-Ann Lindström, 2013. "Gender Bias in Parental Leave: Evidence from Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 235-248, June.

  2. Simon Davies, 2010. "Do shocks have a persistent impact on consumption?," Progress in Development Studies, , vol. 10(1), pages 75-79, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Berhanu, Wassie, 2011. "Recurrent shocks, poverty traps and the degradation of pastoralists’ social capital in southern Ethiopia," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-15, March.

  3. Simon Davies & Tim Hinks, 2010. "Crime and Happiness Amongst Heads of Households in Malawi," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 457-476, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Davies, Simon & Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2009. "Mental accounting and remittances: A study of rural Malawian households," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 321-334, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Sophie Clot & Fano Andriamahefazafy & Gilles Grolleau & Lisette Ibanez & Philippe Méral, 2015. "Compensation and Rewards for Environmental Services 1 (CRES) and efficient design of contracts in developing countries: behavioral insights from a natural field experiment," Post-Print hal-01506387, HAL.
    2. Bhanot, Syon P. & Han, Jiyoung & Jang, Chaning, 2018. "Workfare, wellbeing and consumption: Evidence from a field experiment with Kenya’s urban poor," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 149(C), pages 372-388.
    3. Ngwenya, Mthunzi A. & Paas, Leonard J., 2012. "Lifecycle effects on consumer financial product portfolios in South Africa: An exploratory analysis of four ethnic groups," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 8-18.
    4. Böhme, Marcus, 2013. "Does migration raise agricultural investment? An empirical analysis for rural Mexico," Kiel Working Papers 1840, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Waidler, Jennifer, 2016. "On the fungibility of public and private transfers: A mental accounting approach," MERIT Working Papers 060, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    6. Andrew V. Stephenson & Amanda Wilsker, 2016. "Consumption Effects of Foreign Remittances in Jamaica," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 22(3), pages 309-320, August.
    7. Christiaensen , Luc & Pan, Lei, 2012. "On the fungibility of spending and earnings -- evidence from rural China and Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6298, The World Bank.
    8. Sophie Clot & Fano Andriamahefazafy & Gilles Grolleau & Lisette Ibanez & Philippe Méral, 2014. "Payments for Ecosystem Services: Can we kill two birds with one stone? Insights from a Natural Field Experiment in Madagascar," Working Papers 14-01, LAMETA, Universitiy of Montpellier, revised Jan 2014.
    9. John Yinger & Phuong Nguyen-Hoang, 2015. "The Behavioral Impacts of Poverty Tax Relief: Salience or Framing?," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 186, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    10. Ann Vogel & Kim Korinek, 2012. "Passing by the Girls? Remittance Allocation for Educational Expenditures and Social Inequality in Nepal’s Households 2003–2004," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 61-100, March.
    11. Luc Christiaensen & Lei Pan, 2010. "Transfers and Development: Easy Come, Easy Go?," WIDER Working Paper Series 125, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Michael Clemens and Timothy N. Ogden, 2014. "Migration as a Strategy for Household Finance: A Research Agenda on Remittances, Payments, and Development- Working Paper 354," Working Papers 354, Center for Global Development.

  5. Simon Davies & James Davey, 2008. "A Regional Multiplier Approach to Estimating the Impact of Cash Transfers on the Market: The Case of Cash Transfers in Rural Malawi," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 91-111, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Devereux, "undated". "Social Protection for Enhanced Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-010, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    2. Alderman, Harold & Yemtsov, Ruslan, 2013. "How can safety nets contribute to economic growth ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6437, The World Bank.
    3. Franziska Gassmann & Cecile Cherrier & Andrés Mideros Mora & Pierre Mohnen, 2013. "Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia," Papers inwopa694, Innocenti Working Papers.
    4. Gentilini, Ugo, 2014. "Our daily bread : what is the evidence on comparing cash versus food transfers?," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 89502, The World Bank.
    5. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    6. J. Edward Taylor, 2012. "A Methodology for Local Economy-Wide Impact Evaluation (LEWIE) of Cash Transfers," Working Papers 99, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    7. Devereux, Stephen, 2016. "Social protection for enhanced food security in sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 52-62.
    8. Ronald Mendoza & Ronald, 2010. "Inclusive Crises, Exclusive Recoveries, and Policies to Prevent a Double Whammy for the Poor," Working papers 1004, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
    9. Fisher, Eleanor & Attah, Ramlatu & Barca, Valentina & O'Brien, Clare & Brook, Simon & Holland, Jeremy & Kardan, Andrew & Pavanello, Sara & Pozarny, Pamela, 2017. "The Livelihood Impacts of Cash Transfers in Sub-Saharan Africa: Beneficiary Perspectives from Six Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 299-319.

  6. Tim Hinks & Simon Davies, 2008. "Life satisfaction in Malawi and the importance of relative consumption, polygamy and religion," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 888-904.

    Cited by:

    1. Alem, Yonas & Colmer, Jonathan, 2014. "Optimal Expectations and the Welfare Cost of Climate Variability," Discussion Papers dp-14-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
    2. Monica Guillen-Royo & Laura Camfield & Jackeline Velazco, 2013. "Universal and Local Reconciled: Exploring Satisfaction with Universal and Local Goals in Thailand and Bangladesh," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(2), pages 627-645, September.
    3. Yonas Alem & Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Don't Worry, Be Happy: The Welfare Cost of Climate Variability � A Subjective Well-Being Approach," GRI Working Papers 118, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. Senakpon F. A. Dedehouanou & Johan Swinnen & Miet Maertens, 2013. "Does Contracting Make Farmers Happy? Evidence from Senegal," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59, pages 138-160, October.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations or Wikipedia entries:
  1. Economic Growth and Change of African Countries

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (5) 2007-06-23 2007-06-30 2007-07-13 2007-08-18 2009-10-31. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (5) 2007-06-23 2007-06-30 2007-07-07 2007-07-13 2009-10-31. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (3) 2007-06-23 2007-08-18 2015-01-31
  4. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2007-06-23
  5. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2007-06-30
  6. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2009-10-31
  7. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2007-08-18
  8. NEP-MFD: Microfinance (1) 2007-06-23
  9. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2007-08-18

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