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Social Protection for Enhanced Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

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  • Stephen Devereux

    (Centre for Social Protection, Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, UK)

Abstract

This paper identifies several positive synergies between social protection programmes and food security outcomes. One function of social protection is to manage and reduce vulnerability, and several instruments are reviewed – weather-indexed insurance, public works programmes, emergency food aid and buffer stock management – which all contribute to stabilising income and access to food across good and bad years, or between the harvest and the hungry season. Other social protection instruments aim to contribute to raising household income and crop production, for instance agricultural input subsidies or input trade fairs, as well as public works projects that construct or maintain physical infrastructure such as rural feeder roads and irrigation canals. This paper also argues that food security can be strengthened if social justice is introduced to the design and delivery of social protection programmes. Examples reviewed include rights-based approaches such as employment guarantee schemes, community-based targeting and social audits. The paper concludes by arguing for a comprehensive approach to social protection that will achieve sustainable food security, by combining interventions that stabilise income or food production with those that raise income or food production, and are designed and delivered in ways that enhance social justice.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Devereux, 2012. "Social Protection for Enhanced Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-010, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rac:wpaper:2012-010
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    File URL: http://web.undp.org/africa/knowledge/WP-2012-010-Devereux-social-protection.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simon Davies & James Davey, 2008. "A Regional Multiplier Approach to Estimating the Impact of Cash Transfers on the Market: The Case of Cash Transfers in Rural Malawi," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 91-111, January.
    2. Chetty, Raj & Looney, Adam, 2006. "Consumption smoothing and the welfare consequences of social insurance in developing economies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(12), pages 2351-2356, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Gentilini,Ugo, 2016. "The revival of the"cash versus food"debate : new evidence for an old quandary ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7584, The World Bank.
    2. Pomeroy, Melissa & Suyama, Bianca & Leite, Iara, 2013. "Africa-Brazil Co-Operation in Social Protection: Drivers, Lessons and Shifts in the Engagement of the Brazilian Ministry of Social Development," WIDER Working Paper Series 022, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Sassi, M., 2013. "Child Nutritional Status in the Malawian District of Salima: A Capability Approach," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149892, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    4. Maria Granvik, 2016. "Policy diffusion, domestic politics and social assistance in Lesotho, 1998–2012," WIDER Working Paper Series 146, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sub-Saharan Africa; food security; social protection;

    JEL classification:

    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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