IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aiea13/149892.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Child Nutritional Status in the Malawian District of Salima: A Capability Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Sassi, M.

Abstract

This paper investigates the long- and short-term determinants of child nutritional status in the Malawian district of Salima. Based on monthly data from July 2004 to June 2012, the study applies the capability approach to the analysis of the impact on child nutritional status of a set of indicators representative of household food security, maternal and child care, access to and coverage of health services and health environment conditions. Two models are estimated by OLS in order to compare results based on historical series and their trend-cycle, seasonal and irregular components. Findings suggest to consider the relative response of child nutritional status to food and health in policy making, the importance of efficient and effective coordination mechanisms among stakeholders, the need for a multidimensional food security indicator, the relevance of seasonal events and climatic shocks, and the urgency to arrest the long-term cycle of food insecurity and malnutrition.

Suggested Citation

  • Sassi, M., 2013. "Child Nutritional Status in the Malawian District of Salima: A Capability Approach," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149892, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aiea13:149892
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/149892
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Smith, Lisa C. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 2000. "Explaining child malnutrition in developing countries: a cross-country analysis," Research reports 111, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Amartya Sen, 1981. "Ingredients of Famine Analysis: Availability and Entitlements," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 96(3), pages 433-464.
    3. Andrew C. Harvey, 1990. "The Econometric Analysis of Time Series, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 026208189x, January.
    4. Ellis, Frank & Manda, Elizabeth, 2012. "Seasonal Food Crises and Policy Responses: A Narrative Account of Three Food Security Crises in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(7), pages 1407-1417.
    5. Stephen Devereux, 2012. "Social Protection for Enhanced Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-010, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    6. Jayne, Thomas S. & Tschirley, David L., 2009. "Food Price Spikes and Strategic Interactions between the Public and Private Sectors: Market Failures or Governance Failures," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 97142, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Francesco Burchi & Pasquale De Muro, 2012. "A Human Development and Capability Approach to Food Security: Conceptual Framework and Informational Basis," UNDP Africa Policy Notes 2012-009, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child nutrition; food security; health status; Malawi; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; Q18; J13; O55;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aiea13:149892. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aieaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.